Is stuff singular or plural

Is ‘stuff’ singular or plural?

First, you need to understand that all nouns fall into two categories: count and noncount (also called mass or uncountable).
  Count nouns are further divided into singular and plural forms.
  Plural count nouns can usually be identified by their morphology.
  Plural nouns usually have a plural marker–either regular (months, bushes) or irregular (criteria, men).
  Singular count nouns and noncount nouns are unmarked (peanut, sand, thinking).
  However, some nouns have plural morphology (linguistics, optics), but are actually noncount nouns.
  And some count nouns, such as proper nouns, have only singular forms, while some count nouns, called pluralia tantum, have only plural forms.
  Think cattle and literati.
Within the group of count nouns are a subgroup referred to as collective nouns.
  These refer to groups, such as jury, platoon, and gaggle.
  Depending on the context, these nouns may take singular or plural pronouns.
  Some people argue that they can also govern singular or plural verbs.
  The singular/plural verb rule for collective nouns is observed routinely in British English, but it is dubious in American English.
There are ways to tease out the grammatical classes of nouns.
  I have mentioned three: morphology, pronoun usage, and verb agreement.
  There is one more: quantifier and determiner usage.
  Singular count nouns, plural count nouns, and noncount nouns are paired with different quantifier and determiner words and phrases.
Singular nouns use a, an, and one.
  Plural nouns use two, many, and fewer.
  Noncount nouns use much, little (as a quantifier), and amount of.
  Some determiners and quantifiers can be used with two of the three cases.
  This and that can be used with singular count nouns and  noncount nouns, but not plural count nouns.
  Enough, more, and a lot of can be used with plural count nouns and noncount nouns, but not singular count nouns.
  By the same token, some nouns can be count or noncount, depending on the specific reference: one cake, two cakes, more cakes vs.
more cake, some cake; one hope, two hopes, more hopes,
vs.
more hope, much hope.
There are a number of singular/plural questions on Quora.
  Most are not well stated.
  Asking if a noun is singular confuses as much as it clarifies.
  Both singular count nouns and noncount nouns have singular morphology and take singular verbs and singular pronouns, so in some sense, they are both "singular".
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
  It is more helpful to ask if they are count or noncount.
  If they are count, it is usually easy to figure out what the singular and plural forms are–or if they are one of the singular/plural "problem cases": singularia tantum, pluralia tantum, zero plural, or collective.
Even though semantically stuff refers to a lot of different things, that has nothing to do with its grammatical class.
  By all of the grammatical tests–morphology, determiner and quantifier usage, pronominal agreement, and verb agreement–stuff is a noncount noun, which, by rule, takes singular agreement.
  It is not a count noun of any sort, in particular, not a collective noun.

While mass/collective nouns like “stuff”, “water” or “sand” usually are used only in singular form, there are situations where a plural form can be used.
Its based on the idea that, while they all refer to “collections” of some sort, it’s possible to have multiple collections.
Thus we read/hear phrases like “the sands of the Sahara” or “the waters of Babylon”.
The singular form can be used in such cases, but the plural form has a subtle difference of meaning.
It implies that there’s not just one large expanse of sand or water or whatever.
Rather, there are separate expanses of the substance, each recognized as a separate “thing”.
This is most visible with water, which occurs in patches called rivers, lakes, ponds, etc.
In deserts, there are often sandy areas separated by rocky ground.
It’s not as easy to come up with a real use of “stuffs”, but there are possibilities.
If you’re writing about the collections of “stuff” that people accumulate over time, you might want to talk about the different kinds of collections.
This could easily lead to a reference to the “stuffs” collected by different people, or at different times of their lives, or in different places.
But it’s probably not a word you’d be likely to use much in everyday speech or writing.
My wife and I are both involved in a lot of activities that encourage us to use different rooms as home offices, each with its own collection of “stuff”.
It doesn’t sound odd to me to refer to them as our separate “stuffs”.
But I don’t know if we’ve ever actually used that word.
We also store other kinds of stuff in the basement, adding yet another opportunity for the plural form.

Stuff, as a noun, is one of those words which is inherently plural.
You cannot have one single ‘stuff’.
The word is ‘singular’ but refers to multiple items.
For instance, it is a noun like group, or company, or club, or team.
You can have a group/company/team/club and refer to it as a single ‘item’.
The noun ‘stuff’, however, doesn’t refer to distinct items with PARTICULAR characteristics, and although Joe may have ‘stuff’ and Harry may have different ‘stuff’, you can’t pile their ‘stuff’ together and have ‘stuffs’.
Stuff is far too general a term – it doesn’t refer to any sort of definable, identifiable items.
So you can have ‘three teams’ (plural) or ‘sixteen companies’, but not ‘four stuffs’.
Stuff is just – stuff.
Amorphous, anonymous – stuff.

Is 'stuff' singular or plural?
"Stuff" is a collective noun.
* It means a collection of miscellaneous, unspecified objects.
It is treated as singular.
Example: "My stuff is in the hall" (not "My stuff are in the hall," nor "My stuffs are in the hall").
_
_________________
* What is a Collective Noun? Examples & Exercises | Ginger
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  • What is the most complex grammar rule in any language
  • How did English French and Spanish all get to make plurals by adding an s when other Germanic and Romance languages have different rules for forming plurals
  • Is Spanish a sexist language
  • Can newses be plural of news
  • Can insignia be plural
  • Does salmon have a plural
  • Does salmon have a plural
  • Is cacti plural
  • Can newses be plural of news
  • Can insignia be plural
  • Is popcorns the correct plural form of popcorn
  • How do you pronounce axes plural of axis
  • What is the most difficult grammar rule for Spanish
  • How can I be an Edgy Freshman
  • What interesting grammar forms exist in other languages but not in English
  • How different is Spain Spanish from say Mexican Spanish Puerto Rican Spanish Colombian Spanish etc Is CatalanCastilian that different from the Spanish we hear in the States
  • How different is Mexican Spanish from Standard Castilian Spanish
  • In what cases do you put the adjective before the noun in Spanish
  • Does grammar really matter when we learn English
  • Does grammar really matter when we learn English
  • Why is 0 plural
  • What is the plural of news
  • What is the plural form of axis
  • What is the plural of octopus
  • Whats the plural of LEGO
  • What is the plural of leaf Is it leafs or leaves
  • Will the socalled Romance languages like French Spanish and Italian ever become genderneutral
  • How do you pronounce Quora
  • What is the plural of words like octopus or platypus
  • Is the English sentence Before rock got popular they used to listen to different kinds of music grammatically correct If not how would you change it
  • How often do grammar rules change
  • What is the correct plural of octopus Two of my language teachers have differing answers octopi and octopuses so Id like to have a third opinion
  • How important is grammar
  • On most of Romance languages Spanish Portuguese French the basic rule to make a noun plural is adding s or x Why is Italian so different being the closest to Latin
  • Is Spanish language the easiest to learn of all languages
  • What is the most complicated English grammar rule
  • Are Italian and Spanish similar languages
  • Do you write to please others or to please yourself
  • Do you write to please others or to please yourself
  • Is love just a feeling or something else
  • Can you give me a whole paragraph without using the letters E and I
  • Can you give me a whole paragraph without using the letters E and I
  • Why does the Portuguese language have two verbs for being ser and estar if there is just one in most of the romance languages eg French and Italian
  • Is Spanish difficult to learn
  • How different is Mexican Spanish from Standard Castilian Spanish
  • How do you say hi in Spanish
  • Do grammar rules matter anymore
  • Do grammar rules matter anymore
  • Are Spanish Mexican Hispanic the same thing
  • Are Spanish Mexican Hispanic the same thing
  • Does reading Quora count as reading
  • Does reading Quora count as reading
  • How can I download a free PDF of any book
  • How can I improve my English grammar
  • Can you write something important
  • If you want to write to Obama once he is no longer president to thank him for his service where would you send the letter
  • A global catastrophe reduces the population to 100 mil our infrastructure is mostly destroyed How long would it take to reach modern levels again
  • Can you write something important
  • How is standard Mexican Spanish different from standard Colombian Spanish
  • A global catastrophe reduces the population to 100 mil our infrastructure is mostly destroyed How long would it take to reach modern levels again
  • What are the most common English language and grammatical errors made by people from India eg skipping the word the when writing
  • If a virus wiped out 999 of the human race what would you do to survive the aftermath
  • Are Latinos considered Spanish
  • How do I write a fantasy novel without good and evil clich
  • Do you like reading books
  • How do you say good morning in Spanish
  • What common grammatical mistakes do we make in English