How do I write a movie

How do I write a movie?

Though I have written a couple of scripts which are yet to be validated by the producers to go into production phase, I want to share my own experience with you.
1: Difference between story and script.
Do you want to write a story or a script? Be clear about it because both are different and both are difficult for the novices.
Let us see what are the main differences between these two.
Story: Requires genre, story line, characterization, premise, a starting, a middle, and an apt ending.
The main objective of a story is to TELL about how the characters feel while things are happening to them, and how the characters are reacting and overcoming them.
Hence, story writing mostly involves psychological perception of characters towards a certain situation.
Script: the other name of script is screenplay, which literally means what are you going to play on the screen? A story is to TELL and a screenplay is to SHOW.
Without a story, you can't write a script.
And without a script, you can't shoot or even explain a scene in a simple manner to actors or other crew members on the sets.
So, without a good screenplay, a director will fail to direct the team in successful direction.
So both story and screenplay are different.
And in film making both are important.
In Hollywood, most of the script writers are not story writers, but in bollywood it is not so.
Now that we know this difference, let's move to step 2.
2: Goal and method of script writing.
Film makers goal: To give a product of 120 minutes of audio/video to audience.
How good is that product depends almost on all the factors right from story to final mixing.
Script writers goal: To mould the story in the hand into a proper document.
This document will serve as a blueprint for the entire production and post production of the movie.
How is this done?
A) Divide the story into scenes.
(Note: A scene is a part of a story which happens at one location at one time.
Generally a commercial movie has around 60 to 70 scenes.
)
B) Divide the scenes into sub scenes.
(A scene may sometimes be lengthy and may also involve two or three locations like that of a telephonic coversation between friends, then the scenes need to be divided into sub scenes as they cannot be shot at one time.
)
C) Divide scenes/subscenes into shots.
A shot will guide the team on framing aspect of a scene.
Generally a scene starts with a very wide/wide frame to tell the audience about where it is taking place.
And then it gradually moves to mid frame, and to close ups and extreme close ups at times.
D) Start every scene with proper scene no, location, time.
Ex: Scene 5 Location: Market Time: Morning
E) Start with proper scene description.
Start every sentence in a new line.
Most of the times, one sentence in the script will require one shot.
Ex:
There was a market.
People were busy buying and selling vegetables at various shops.
Bunty was observing the shops and the people.
F) Before a particular dialogue, write the character’s name.
Ex:
Bunty to shop owner
Uncle, yeh kaddu kite ka hain?
Shop owner
Ek kaddu 20 rupay.
Bunty
Par baajoo shop me tho 10 ko hi Mil raha hain.
Shop owner
Tho wahi pe khareed na, yaha pe kyu aaya.
Chal footle yaha se.
3.
Honing the script writing skills

A) Before you write a script, download and read some scripts from internet.
This will give you an idea of what a script is and how it looks like.
B) Read at least 1 to 2 books on script writing to gain exceptional clarity on the process.
Sometimes, though there is a story in your hands, you might wonder about how to present in in a visual format to audience, as they might be lacking dialogues, intervals etc.
These books are there to guide you.
One book that I personally like is Save the Cat by Blake Snyder.
It is simple and easy to understand.
C) Watch movies and observe how the scenes are shot.
One is an action scene, and the other one a love and then there is a comdey scene.
Take a love scene for instance, observe how hero looked at heroine, how well she smiled and lowered her eye lids, then how he came near her, and then how she shied and turned away.
Each shot is a part of script written by some screen writer somewhere.
So, observe as much as possible and try to understand how it would have been written.
D) Though reading and observing are good, there is definitely no replacement for doing.
Why don't you write a script for a small story today? And check whether your script is really helping your team in the process of film making.
If no one is ready to shoot your script, why don't you yourself go ahead and make it and check where you stand as a script writer?
All the best!

First Understand what a script is.
The script, or screenplay, outlines all of the elements (audio, visual, behavior, and dialogue) that are required to tell a story through movies or TV.
Read the scripts of some of your favorite movies.
Find movie scripts online and decide what you like (and don’t like) about them.
Get a feel for how the action is portrayed, dialogue is written, and characters are developed.
Flesh out your concept.
Assuming you already have an idea you want to write about, sketch out all the necessary plot details, relationships, and personality traits that will guide your story.
Outline your story.
Begin with a basic flow of your narrative.
Focus on the conflict of the story; conflict drives drama.
Write your story in three acts.
The pillars of a screenplay are the Three Acts.
Each act can operate independently, and when taken together provide the full arc of a story.

Permit me to answer your question with a true story from real movie history life.
The purpose for this explanatory method is to clearly illustrate and fully substantiate the answer I shall herein provide for you.
Mario Puzo had never written a script for a movie.
He was a novelist.
When a novel he wrote entitled The Godfather became a bestseller, Paramount Studios bought the film rights to the book and wanted Mario to assist a young and as yet unknown director with adapting the novel into a screenplay for the motion picture version of The Godfather.
The reason Paramount hired the young unknown director was because said director was willing to work for a mere pittance, a paltry stipends, of a paycheck.
That director’s name was Francis Ford Coppola.
After the blockbuster box office success of The Godfather movie, Hollywood wanted a sequel and of course they wanted Mario to assist Francis with writing the screenplay for the second film.
Mario didn’t know how to write a screenplay, so he went to the bookstore where he purchased an instructional manual which provided information explaining, according to the industry standards of that era, how to write a script for a movie.
When he got home and opened the manual, there on page one he read that in order to gain an understanding of how to write a screenplay, one should examine Mario Puzo’s The Godfather.

This true life parable effectively demonstrates that in order to write a script for a movie, one should first write a bestselling novel.
The Old Salts of commercial fishing boats often quote a saying that has its origins in the distant mist-shrouded depths of the ancient maritime past.
The briny Old Salts say, “The more you fish, the luckier you are.

Therefore, the more you write, the greater success you’ll have with writing scripts for movies.
So, there’s another place for you to start writing scripts for movies.
The place to start is by writing every day and every night.
I congratulate you on your admirable ambition to be a successful award-winning script writer! I look forward to seeing your name listed when the credits roll!

Just like every car has four wheels and two axles, each screenplay has the same basic structural parts – the nuts and bolts – to make it work.
However, there is a huge difference between a two passenger Smart Car and a ‘64 Cobra 289.
Both will get you to your final destination, but the ride will be a completely different experience.

Screenwriting is like car building.
It’s a trade.
It uses a very specific format, follows a universal structure, and must meet audience expectations.
To do otherwise, is suicide.

Imagine the automobile industry installing wheels on the roof of cars.
Nobody wants to drive upside down.
Screenwriting works the same way.
There is a blueprint – structured through acts, sequences, and plot points – that almost every movie follows.
This is the science of the screenplay, the dramaturgy, but science is only a part of cinematic story telling.
Of course every great screenplay must have a solid structural foundation, but it is also essential to write with an original voice and have a powerful, and hopefully topical, concept with incredibly interesting, flawed, and empathetic characters – and all of this must be in proper screenplay form.

To think of The Formula as a recipe to write your great Hollywood script using structure alone would be shortsighted.
Structure without character, character without story, story without voice, and voice without form.
.
.
it simply doesn’t work.
The Formula is only as strong as it’s weakest link, so in order for you to be a successful screenwriter, you must achieve all five parts: CHARACTER, STORY, STRUCTURE, VOICE, and FORM.
The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting provides the essential pieces you need to construct a sellable script, regardless of genre.
But it is essential to understand that The Formula is never about being formulaic.
There is nothing conventional about creating interesting, believable, and unique characters, nor is there any paint-by-number directions to germinate and develop an original story, and even though three act structure has rules to guide you, it’s all very flexible.
Nothing is set in stone.

So whether this is your first screenplay or you’ve been writing for years, you’ve come the right place.
This online version of The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting, was built as completely searchable resource to guide you through journey of building a screenplay from the beginning, or answer specific questions that might pop up during the development process.

Enjoy, Good Luck, and Get Started

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Quite off topic, but I have just won a free iohawk hoverboard, I already got one , probably gonna give it to my brother's son.
Check the website yourself, they are giving one every week.

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

You start with an idea, a concept.
– Also called a Logline
Come up with a setup for a story that you can tell in a sentence of 35 words or less and make sure it works.
A great concept for a story is the foundation for everything that follows and it should consist of;
A story setup should inspire the reader to raise one specific question that we want to know the answer to.
And that question is what we call the “The Dramatic Question”
Will E.
T come home? Will Indiana Jones find the lost Ark? are examples of such questions.
They are the driving force of any plot and so it’s one of the most important thing that a functional story concept must do; to raise that specific question.
Raising the dramatic question is really the main purpose of every concept.
But the mistake that many new writers do is to assume that the question raises itself.
That’s a huge mistake.
Just because someone was murdered, in a story, that doesn’t mean that the audience will automatically ask them selves; Who did it?
The dramatic question is something that the story should be carefully constructed to raise by how the setup works.
Only when If the goal is important enough and the obstacles are big enough and the threat is, threatening enough, will it cause the audience to raise that question, not before.
Here is an example of a concept with my breakdown of it:
THE HANGOVER
Three groomsmen lose their about-to-be-wed buddy during their drunken misadventures, then must retrace their steps in order to find him before the wedding in 24 hours.

My breakdown of the Logline:
The Dramatic question: Will they find their buddy before his wedding?
Their problem: They´ve lost their buddy
Their Goal: They must find him (this makes it a quest plot)
Their deficiency/handicap: They are drunk, they´ve lost their memory, they´ve only got 24 hours.

The threat: if they don´t find him, he will miss his wedding and possibly his marriage.
(once again a lot worse situation than their problem)


It can take a long time to come up with a concept that works, that raises the right question, that inspires us to wanna see how it turns out.
Dedicate a lot of your energy and time to make your Log line work.
But the beauty of working with concepts is that it doesn't take long to re-write one single sentence.
But if it DOESN’T work and you dive right into the screenplay, then you have to re-write a whole 120 page screenplay, which can take months rather than just changing that one single line and remedying the problem before you move on.
So that’s my professional advice to you; work on Loglines.
Write as many as you can then pick the best out of a 100.
Once you’ve accomplished that, re-write it until it works.
That’s how professional screenwriters work and so should you, if you want to learn the craft.
Good Luck!!!

The best advice I can give is to know your own writing process.
If you’ve never written ANYthing before, a speech, paper, or short story or article, know how you work and then find that groove in order to complete a script.
It helps to outline a cohesive story first and be as specific as you can.
Outline a scene and then try to write THAT scene.
Sometimes one scene can make you tell whether or not its an Idea you want to actually explore or leave.
Be sure to SAVE all your drafts and changes and all ideas so that you can see your evolution process and you can learn more.
It really is helpful I’ve found.
And finally, be prepared to edit A LOT.
Throw out lines and scenes that don’t work even though they may be the best thing you’ve ever written.
Save it and use it for something else later.
Be prepared for a lot of criticism and if your script gets made, be prepared for it to be re-written and changed A LOT even if you’re a part of the process.
Sometimes changes are a part of the collaborative experience and just plain necessary given restraints and story.
Find an Idea you’re committed to and passionate about, and then just write it.
Story is important, but find or tell a story YOU really want to get put out there and people to know and enjoy.
If you’re attached to a story or idea, you’re less likely to just leave it unfinished and move on.
My first script I wrote in high-school using Microsoft word and all it consisted of was some descriptions of scenes and shots and then all the dialogue for the characters.
Once I became comfortable with my own style of writing scripts I began to learn the “proper” way to do it and transferred my script to a formal (screenplay/script) form.
Guides for this can be found online, and definitions for the proper word and terms usages.
Also free templates can be found on some sites, that will help you do it for you.
And some sites give you writing tools and the template for a small one time fee if that’s what you’re interested in.
I do not recommend buying a script writing software as it just doesn’t seem cost effective to me.
If you sell a script or get something made and are cranking out scripts left and right, maybe then would be a good time to invest in that.
Hope this works!

After tons and tons of work.
It's next to impossible to begin writing the actual script before working out the plot, theme, what you want to say, who your characters are – not to mention researching.
This is due to the fact that screenplay pages are meant to be a film in a written form, and while in novels and prose in general, meandering and deepening the subject matter works, in films, everything has to be in constant movement – film is storytelling with movement, whether it's actual movement of characters, camera etc.
or “apparent” movement of cuts.
You can't keep things moving (or moving in the right direction) if your mind blanks out about important facets of your story.
Work them out as best as you can.
Jot down those exquisite lines, descriptions, and actions in a notebook, where they'll be waiting while you work out your story by outlining, mind mapping, and doing whatever else feels appropriate.
Good luck and perseverance!

Well, to begin with you should do some brainstorming before you actually begin to write something.
Remember it’s your first time, so be cautious enough to make your stuff entertaining enough and avoid unintended cliche.
The idea of getting recurring success based on some fixed ideology or concept can only work for some seasoned film maker.
So just make it a point that you stick to originality.
This does not mean you cannot use something that has influenced you for the lifetime.
The first and most important thing is to decide the character map.
Select a central character around which the whole story will be woven.
It’s easier to imagine and write screenplays that way, so there are no loose ends to the whole thing.
Writing a screenplay involving multiple central characters will turn up into a mess at some stage, so as a novice you should avoid it.
Now a key point to remember here is that you have to first decide the flow of the characters along the film and then create the scenes.
Once you’ve done with creation of scenes, it’s now time to add a complete personality to your characters.
I would recommend to always keep the personality to character mapping at last, as it gives you good creative freedom.
Write down all the nuances of all the characters in your script.
Always take a look at this data, before writing scenes and dialogues between your characters.
Finally compile all your scenes together to form a great screenplay.
No matter how good screenplay you write, the director is bound to make changes according to his comfort when he will direct the stuff.
So keep some fluidity while writing the scenes unless you are writing for a genre like thriller, crime drama, etc.
Finally if you are a novice and you have got very experience in writing, then always try to write some lightweight genre like romance or family drama.
As a novice, one shouldn’t try hand at crime dramas, sport dramas and never even think of writing comedies.
Once you’ve tried your luck 2–3 times, you can try experimenting with different genres.

If you don’t know how to write a movie script, then my advice to you, first and foremost, is to take a screenwriting class.
If you are not in Los Angeles or New York, that should not be a problem.
There are many online courses available.
I believe Gotham Writers Workshop has them available.
There are also loads of screenwriting classes available online through places like Teachable.
Just do a search for online screenwriting.
If you are in Los Angeles, you can take a Community College course or take a class through UCLA Extension.
What’s great about UCLA Extension is that you have actual screenwriters with solid credits teaching the courses.
If you do take a course, I would suggest taking one that teaches you how to write the first 10 pages or the first act of your screenplay.
Do not worry about learning the whole process in one course.
While there are courses that offer that option, I can tell you from experience and film development knowledge that the first 10 pages are the most important in your screenplay.
I worked as a Development Executive as well as a Reader.
There is a well-known rule in Hollywood: If the first 10 pages suck, then don’t bother with the rest of the script.
That harsh reality means that if I am not intrigued by the first 10 pages, your script will end up in the trash, either on my computer or in a recycling bin.
Now, before you feel that I am being mean, I can tell you that after reading hundreds of scripts, you want to pull your hair out if the writing is bad.
After thousands, you want to throw the script into a fire.
I realize that sounds harsh but Hollywood is harsh.
It is far better to know how people are going in than expecting to be welcomed with love, unicorns and butterflies that have banners exclaiming you are a great writer.
That does not even happen when you win an Oscar.
Another harsh truth is that your first few screenplays might not be perfect.
They might suck, but that is okay.
That is you learning how to write.
There is a story I used to hear in a TV writing course where a well-known show runner said that no script was good until it was on top of the pile of scripts on your floor that essentially reached your mid-calf.
He said that was the script he would read and it would most likely be the best-written one.
That means most likely script number seven, eight, nine or ten.
Therefore, learning the craft of screenwriting is essential.
Reading books helps a lot but nothing replaces going into a class or taking a class and truly learning about the process.
Hal Ackerman is a great screenwriting teacher.
I took two courses from him while I was at UCLA and one of the courses was simply watching the first ten minutes of films he felt were great for establishing character.
Then we would write an essay on those first ten minutes and finally, write our first ten pages of the screenplay.
I learned more in that course than I learned in many of my undergrad classes.
The second writing course I would recommend is learning how to write a proper first act of your screenplay.
Yes, that is it.
Three months on 30 pages; but guess what? You should have a solid 30 pages.
I can’t impress upon you how important having a strong opening and first act are.
It can make or break your screenplay.
The reason for this is that if the reader or executive or assistant has just invested at least 30 minutes of his or her life, then he or she believes this script has potential.
That is the only way your entire script will be read.
The other important thing is to buy some screenplays of movies that you like.
Read them like you are reading a book.
See the difference between screenwriting and novel writing.
The main difference is the format and the fact that screenwriting is sparse.
You need to pack everything, emotions, dialogue and action into one to three pages of a scene.
In a novel, you can take five or ten pages to write the same thing.
Learning to be a good storyteller with very little language is an art form.
Another thing you should know is that if you do not properly format your screenplay, it won’t get read.
A nice person might let you know you need to format it correctly.
Most people will just toss it.
This is why a beginning screenwriting class is so good.
You will spend quite a while learning how to format things.
It is not a waste of time, it is essential to being a good screenwriter.
Before anyone feels too put upon to learn the formatting, think about this: when I first took a screenwriting course in the early 1990s, I had to type all my scenes on my IBM Selectric typewriter.
I actually had to learn how to set tabs on it.
You also need screenwriting software.
As Madeleine said below, get Final Draft.
Now, I have a definite ambivalence to Final Draft.
I think it is clunky and not as intuitive as it could be.
I also think their key code method is ridiculous.
If you change computers, you have to change the key code.
If you want to write on two different computers, it costs you more money.
They are also very expensive.
However, they tend to be the industry standard.
That said, a lot of my writer friends use other scriptwriting software.
It just depends.
If you take a course, you should find out which one you need before you invest.
I think the free software is a waste of your time.
It never does what you need it to do.
Finally, I would look at some old editions of Written By, the WGAWest magazine.
There are a lot of great interviews.
You can learn a lot about screenwriting by listening to writers talk about their craft.
One last thing, when you are done writing, always register your script with the Writer’s Guild.
You can do it online.
You can also copyright it as well.
Good luck!

How do I write a movie?

Though I have written a couple of scripts which are yet to be validated by the producers to go into production phase, I want to share my own experience with you.
1: Difference between story and script.
Do you want to write a story or a script? Be clear about it because both are different and both are difficult for the novices.
Let us see what are the main differences between these two.
Story: Requires genre, story line, characterization, premise, a starting, a middle, and an apt ending.
The main objective of a story is to TELL about how the characters feel while things are happening to them, and how the characters are reacting and overcoming them.
Hence, story writing mostly involves psychological perception of characters towards a certain situation.
Script: the other name of script is screenplay, which literally means what are you going to play on the screen? A story is to TELL and a screenplay is to SHOW.
Without a story, you can't write a script.
And without a script, you can't shoot or even explain a scene in a simple manner to actors or other crew members on the sets.
So, without a good screenplay, a director will fail to direct the team in successful direction.
So both story and screenplay are different.
And in film making both are important.
In Hollywood, most of the script writers are not story writers, but in bollywood it is not so.
Now that we know this difference, let's move to step 2.
2: Goal and method of script writing.
Film makers goal: To give a product of 120 minutes of audio/video to audience.
How good is that product depends almost on all the factors right from story to final mixing.
Script writers goal: To mould the story in the hand into a proper document.
This document will serve as a blueprint for the entire production and post production of the movie.
How is this done?
A) Divide the story into scenes.
(Note: A scene is a part of a story which happens at one location at one time.
Generally a commercial movie has around 60 to 70 scenes.
)
B) Divide the scenes into sub scenes.
(A scene may sometimes be lengthy and may also involve two or three locations like that of a telephonic coversation between friends, then the scenes need to be divided into sub scenes as they cannot be shot at one time.
)
C) Divide scenes/subscenes into shots.
A shot will guide the team on framing aspect of a scene.
Generally a scene starts with a very wide/wide frame to tell the audience about where it is taking place.
And then it gradually moves to mid frame, and to close ups and extreme close ups at times.
D) Start every scene with proper scene no, location, time.
Ex: Scene 5 Location: Market Time: Morning
E) Start with proper scene description.
Start every sentence in a new line.
Most of the times, one sentence in the script will require one shot.
Ex:
There was a market.
People were busy buying and selling vegetables at various shops.
Bunty was observing the shops and the people.
F) Before a particular dialogue, write the character’s name.
Ex:
Bunty to shop owner
Uncle, yeh kaddu kite ka hain?
Shop owner
Ek kaddu 20 rupay.
Bunty
Par baajoo shop me tho 10 ko hi Mil raha hain.
Shop owner
Tho wahi pe khareed na, yaha pe kyu aaya.
Chal footle yaha se.
3.
Honing the script writing skills

A) Before you write a script, download and read some scripts from internet.
This will give you an idea of what a script is and how it looks like.
B) Read at least 1 to 2 books on script writing to gain exceptional clarity on the process.
Sometimes, though there is a story in your hands, you might wonder about how to present in in a visual format to audience, as they might be lacking dialogues, intervals etc.
These books are there to guide you.
One book that I personally like is Save the Cat by Blake Snyder.
It is simple and easy to understand.
C) Watch movies and observe how the scenes are shot.
One is an action scene, and the other one a love and then there is a comdey scene.
Take a love scene for instance, observe how hero looked at heroine, how well she smiled and lowered her eye lids, then how he came near her, and then how she shied and turned away.
Each shot is a part of script written by some screen writer somewhere.
So, observe as much as possible and try to understand how it would have been written.
D) Though reading and observing are good, there is definitely no replacement for doing.
Why don't you write a script for a small story today? And check whether your script is really helping your team in the process of film making.
If no one is ready to shoot your script, why don't you yourself go ahead and make it and check where you stand as a script writer?
All the best!

First Understand what a script is.
The script, or screenplay, outlines all of the elements (audio, visual, behavior, and dialogue) that are required to tell a story through movies or TV.
Read the scripts of some of your favorite movies.
Find movie scripts online and decide what you like (and don’t like) about them.
Get a feel for how the action is portrayed, dialogue is written, and characters are developed.
Flesh out your concept.
Assuming you already have an idea you want to write about, sketch out all the necessary plot details, relationships, and personality traits that will guide your story.
Outline your story.
Begin with a basic flow of your narrative.
Focus on the conflict of the story; conflict drives drama.
Write your story in three acts.
The pillars of a screenplay are the Three Acts.
Each act can operate independently, and when taken together provide the full arc of a story.

Permit me to answer your question with a true story from real movie history life.
The purpose for this explanatory method is to clearly illustrate and fully substantiate the answer I shall herein provide for you.
Mario Puzo had never written a script for a movie.
He was a novelist.
When a novel he wrote entitled The Godfather became a bestseller, Paramount Studios bought the film rights to the book and wanted Mario to assist a young and as yet unknown director with adapting the novel into a screenplay for the motion picture version of The Godfather.
The reason Paramount hired the young unknown director was because said director was willing to work for a mere pittance, a paltry stipends, of a paycheck.
That director’s name was Francis Ford Coppola.
After the blockbuster box office success of The Godfather movie, Hollywood wanted a sequel and of course they wanted Mario to assist Francis with writing the screenplay for the second film.
Mario didn’t know how to write a screenplay, so he went to the bookstore where he purchased an instructional manual which provided information explaining, according to the industry standards of that era, how to write a script for a movie.
When he got home and opened the manual, there on page one he read that in order to gain an understanding of how to write a screenplay, one should examine Mario Puzo’s The Godfather.

This true life parable effectively demonstrates that in order to write a script for a movie, one should first write a bestselling novel.
The Old Salts of commercial fishing boats often quote a saying that has its origins in the distant mist-shrouded depths of the ancient maritime past.
The briny Old Salts say, “The more you fish, the luckier you are.

Therefore, the more you write, the greater success you’ll have with writing scripts for movies.
So, there’s another place for you to start writing scripts for movies.
The place to start is by writing every day and every night.
I congratulate you on your admirable ambition to be a successful award-winning script writer! I look forward to seeing your name listed when the credits roll!

Just like every car has four wheels and two axles, each screenplay has the same basic structural parts – the nuts and bolts – to make it work.
However, there is a huge difference between a two passenger Smart Car and a ‘64 Cobra 289.
Both will get you to your final destination, but the ride will be a completely different experience.

Screenwriting is like car building.
It’s a trade.
It uses a very specific format, follows a universal structure, and must meet audience expectations.
To do otherwise, is suicide.

Imagine the automobile industry installing wheels on the roof of cars.
Nobody wants to drive upside down.
Screenwriting works the same way.
There is a blueprint – structured through acts, sequences, and plot points – that almost every movie follows.
This is the science of the screenplay, the dramaturgy, but science is only a part of cinematic story telling.
Of course every great screenplay must have a solid structural foundation, but it is also essential to write with an original voice and have a powerful, and hopefully topical, concept with incredibly interesting, flawed, and empathetic characters – and all of this must be in proper screenplay form.

To think of The Formula as a recipe to write your great Hollywood script using structure alone would be shortsighted.
Structure without character, character without story, story without voice, and voice without form.
.
.
it simply doesn’t work.
The Formula is only as strong as it’s weakest link, so in order for you to be a successful screenwriter, you must achieve all five parts: CHARACTER, STORY, STRUCTURE, VOICE, and FORM.
The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting provides the essential pieces you need to construct a sellable script, regardless of genre.
But it is essential to understand that The Formula is never about being formulaic.
There is nothing conventional about creating interesting, believable, and unique characters, nor is there any paint-by-number directions to germinate and develop an original story, and even though three act structure has rules to guide you, it’s all very flexible.
Nothing is set in stone.

So whether this is your first screenplay or you’ve been writing for years, you’ve come the right place.
This online version of The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting, was built as completely searchable resource to guide you through journey of building a screenplay from the beginning, or answer specific questions that might pop up during the development process.

Enjoy, Good Luck, and Get Started

———————————————————————————————

Quite off topic, but I have just won a free iohawk hoverboard, I already got one , probably gonna give it to my brother's son.
Check the website yourself, they are giving one every week.

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

You start with an idea, a concept.
– Also called a Logline
Come up with a setup for a story that you can tell in a sentence of 35 words or less and make sure it works.
A great concept for a story is the foundation for everything that follows and it should consist of;
A story setup should inspire the reader to raise one specific question that we want to know the answer to.
And that question is what we call the “The Dramatic Question”
Will E.
T come home? Will Indiana Jones find the lost Ark? are examples of such questions.
They are the driving force of any plot and so it’s one of the most important thing that a functional story concept must do; to raise that specific question.
Raising the dramatic question is really the main purpose of every concept.
But the mistake that many new writers do is to assume that the question raises itself.
That’s a huge mistake.
Just because someone was murdered, in a story, that doesn’t mean that the audience will automatically ask them selves; Who did it?
The dramatic question is something that the story should be carefully constructed to raise by how the setup works.
Only when If the goal is important enough and the obstacles are big enough and the threat is, threatening enough, will it cause the audience to raise that question, not before.
Here is an example of a concept with my breakdown of it:
THE HANGOVER
Three groomsmen lose their about-to-be-wed buddy during their drunken misadventures, then must retrace their steps in order to find him before the wedding in 24 hours.

My breakdown of the Logline:
The Dramatic question: Will they find their buddy before his wedding?
Their problem: They´ve lost their buddy
Their Goal: They must find him (this makes it a quest plot)
Their deficiency/handicap: They are drunk, they´ve lost their memory, they´ve only got 24 hours.

The threat: if they don´t find him, he will miss his wedding and possibly his marriage.
(once again a lot worse situation than their problem)


It can take a long time to come up with a concept that works, that raises the right question, that inspires us to wanna see how it turns out.
Dedicate a lot of your energy and time to make your Log line work.
But the beauty of working with concepts is that it doesn't take long to re-write one single sentence.
But if it DOESN’T work and you dive right into the screenplay, then you have to re-write a whole 120 page screenplay, which can take months rather than just changing that one single line and remedying the problem before you move on.
So that’s my professional advice to you; work on Loglines.
Write as many as you can then pick the best out of a 100.
Once you’ve accomplished that, re-write it until it works.
That’s how professional screenwriters work and so should you, if you want to learn the craft.
Good Luck!!!

The best advice I can give is to know your own writing process.
If you’ve never written ANYthing before, a speech, paper, or short story or article, know how you work and then find that groove in order to complete a script.
It helps to outline a cohesive story first and be as specific as you can.
Outline a scene and then try to write THAT scene.
Sometimes one scene can make you tell whether or not its an Idea you want to actually explore or leave.
Be sure to SAVE all your drafts and changes and all ideas so that you can see your evolution process and you can learn more.
It really is helpful I’ve found.
And finally, be prepared to edit A LOT.
Throw out lines and scenes that don’t work even though they may be the best thing you’ve ever written.
Save it and use it for something else later.
Be prepared for a lot of criticism and if your script gets made, be prepared for it to be re-written and changed A LOT even if you’re a part of the process.
Sometimes changes are a part of the collaborative experience and just plain necessary given restraints and story.
Find an Idea you’re committed to and passionate about, and then just write it.
Story is important, but find or tell a story YOU really want to get put out there and people to know and enjoy.
If you’re attached to a story or idea, you’re less likely to just leave it unfinished and move on.
My first script I wrote in high-school using Microsoft word and all it consisted of was some descriptions of scenes and shots and then all the dialogue for the characters.
Once I became comfortable with my own style of writing scripts I began to learn the “proper” way to do it and transferred my script to a formal (screenplay/script) form.
Guides for this can be found online, and definitions for the proper word and terms usages.
Also free templates can be found on some sites, that will help you do it for you.
And some sites give you writing tools and the template for a small one time fee if that’s what you’re interested in.
I do not recommend buying a script writing software as it just doesn’t seem cost effective to me.
If you sell a script or get something made and are cranking out scripts left and right, maybe then would be a good time to invest in that.
Hope this works!

After tons and tons of work.
It's next to impossible to begin writing the actual script before working out the plot, theme, what you want to say, who your characters are – not to mention researching.
This is due to the fact that screenplay pages are meant to be a film in a written form, and while in novels and prose in general, meandering and deepening the subject matter works, in films, everything has to be in constant movement – film is storytelling with movement, whether it's actual movement of characters, camera etc.
or “apparent” movement of cuts.
You can't keep things moving (or moving in the right direction) if your mind blanks out about important facets of your story.
Work them out as best as you can.
Jot down those exquisite lines, descriptions, and actions in a notebook, where they'll be waiting while you work out your story by outlining, mind mapping, and doing whatever else feels appropriate.
Good luck and perseverance!

Well, to begin with you should do some brainstorming before you actually begin to write something.
Remember it’s your first time, so be cautious enough to make your stuff entertaining enough and avoid unintended cliche.
The idea of getting recurring success based on some fixed ideology or concept can only work for some seasoned film maker.
So just make it a point that you stick to originality.
This does not mean you cannot use something that has influenced you for the lifetime.
The first and most important thing is to decide the character map.
Select a central character around which the whole story will be woven.
It’s easier to imagine and write screenplays that way, so there are no loose ends to the whole thing.
Writing a screenplay involving multiple central characters will turn up into a mess at some stage, so as a novice you should avoid it.
Now a key point to remember here is that you have to first decide the flow of the characters along the film and then create the scenes.
Once you’ve done with creation of scenes, it’s now time to add a complete personality to your characters.
I would recommend to always keep the personality to character mapping at last, as it gives you good creative freedom.
Write down all the nuances of all the characters in your script.
Always take a look at this data, before writing scenes and dialogues between your characters.
Finally compile all your scenes together to form a great screenplay.
No matter how good screenplay you write, the director is bound to make changes according to his comfort when he will direct the stuff.
So keep some fluidity while writing the scenes unless you are writing for a genre like thriller, crime drama, etc.
Finally if you are a novice and you have got very experience in writing, then always try to write some lightweight genre like romance or family drama.
As a novice, one shouldn’t try hand at crime dramas, sport dramas and never even think of writing comedies.
Once you’ve tried your luck 2–3 times, you can try experimenting with different genres.

If you don’t know how to write a movie script, then my advice to you, first and foremost, is to take a screenwriting class.
If you are not in Los Angeles or New York, that should not be a problem.
There are many online courses available.
I believe Gotham Writers Workshop has them available.
There are also loads of screenwriting classes available online through places like Teachable.
Just do a search for online screenwriting.
If you are in Los Angeles, you can take a Community College course or take a class through UCLA Extension.
What’s great about UCLA Extension is that you have actual screenwriters with solid credits teaching the courses.
If you do take a course, I would suggest taking one that teaches you how to write the first 10 pages or the first act of your screenplay.
Do not worry about learning the whole process in one course.
While there are courses that offer that option, I can tell you from experience and film development knowledge that the first 10 pages are the most important in your screenplay.
I worked as a Development Executive as well as a Reader.
There is a well-known rule in Hollywood: If the first 10 pages suck, then don’t bother with the rest of the script.
That harsh reality means that if I am not intrigued by the first 10 pages, your script will end up in the trash, either on my computer or in a recycling bin.
Now, before you feel that I am being mean, I can tell you that after reading hundreds of scripts, you want to pull your hair out if the writing is bad.
After thousands, you want to throw the script into a fire.
I realize that sounds harsh but Hollywood is harsh.
It is far better to know how people are going in than expecting to be welcomed with love, unicorns and butterflies that have banners exclaiming you are a great writer.
That does not even happen when you win an Oscar.
Another harsh truth is that your first few screenplays might not be perfect.
They might suck, but that is okay.
That is you learning how to write.
There is a story I used to hear in a TV writing course where a well-known show runner said that no script was good until it was on top of the pile of scripts on your floor that essentially reached your mid-calf.
He said that was the script he would read and it would most likely be the best-written one.
That means most likely script number seven, eight, nine or ten.
Therefore, learning the craft of screenwriting is essential.
Reading books helps a lot but nothing replaces going into a class or taking a class and truly learning about the process.
Hal Ackerman is a great screenwriting teacher.
I took two courses from him while I was at UCLA and one of the courses was simply watching the first ten minutes of films he felt were great for establishing character.
Then we would write an essay on those first ten minutes and finally, write our first ten pages of the screenplay.
I learned more in that course than I learned in many of my undergrad classes.
The second writing course I would recommend is learning how to write a proper first act of your screenplay.
Yes, that is it.
Three months on 30 pages; but guess what? You should have a solid 30 pages.
I can’t impress upon you how important having a strong opening and first act are.
It can make or break your screenplay.
The reason for this is that if the reader or executive or assistant has just invested at least 30 minutes of his or her life, then he or she believes this script has potential.
That is the only way your entire script will be read.
The other important thing is to buy some screenplays of movies that you like.
Read them like you are reading a book.
See the difference between screenwriting and novel writing.
The main difference is the format and the fact that screenwriting is sparse.
You need to pack everything, emotions, dialogue and action into one to three pages of a scene.
In a novel, you can take five or ten pages to write the same thing.
Learning to be a good storyteller with very little language is an art form.
Another thing you should know is that if you do not properly format your screenplay, it won’t get read.
A nice person might let you know you need to format it correctly.
Most people will just toss it.
This is why a beginning screenwriting class is so good.
You will spend quite a while learning how to format things.
It is not a waste of time, it is essential to being a good screenwriter.
Before anyone feels too put upon to learn the formatting, think about this: when I first took a screenwriting course in the early 1990s, I had to type all my scenes on my IBM Selectric typewriter.
I actually had to learn how to set tabs on it.
You also need screenwriting software.
As Madeleine said below, get Final Draft.
Now, I have a definite ambivalence to Final Draft.
I think it is clunky and not as intuitive as it could be.
I also think their key code method is ridiculous.
If you change computers, you have to change the key code.
If you want to write on two different computers, it costs you more money.
They are also very expensive.
However, they tend to be the industry standard.
That said, a lot of my writer friends use other scriptwriting software.
It just depends.
If you take a course, you should find out which one you need before you invest.
I think the free software is a waste of your time.
It never does what you need it to do.
Finally, I would look at some old editions of Written By, the WGAWest magazine.
There are a lot of great interviews.
You can learn a lot about screenwriting by listening to writers talk about their craft.
One last thing, when you are done writing, always register your script with the Writer’s Guild.
You can do it online.
You can also copyright it as well.
Good luck!

Well, i guess i get moved many a times
This is how many a stories have taken birth in me.
Not every story has been made in to a film.
But yes, about twenty five to thirty stories of mine have been made in to films.
Either by other directors or by me.

I think when writing a script a good decision is to follow the best practices of successful screenwriters.
For example, everyone know Tarantino, right? His new movie Hateful Eight has just come out.

Well, the main techniques that Tarantino uses include the following:
1) Mirroring – reading the script aloud to a friend to hear it "from another side"
2) Telling the Truth – the characters should be themselves, don't make them do what they wouldn't do
3) Tangential Scenes – write dialogues that may not develop the plot but establish the characters.
4) Distance Helps – write a really long script, put it away, edit it in 6 months.
Here's an image and a nice article that illustrates all of these tips:

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

You start with an idea, a concept.
– Also called a Logline
Come up with a setup for a story that you can tell in a sentence of 35 words or less and make sure it works.
A great concept for a story is the foundation for everything that follows and it should consist of;
A story setup should inspire the reader to raise one specific question that we want to know the answer to.
And that question is what we call the “The Dramatic Question”
Will E.
T come home? Will Indiana Jones find the lost Ark? are examples of such questions.
They are the driving force of any plot and so it’s one of the most important thing that a functional story concept must do; to raise that specific question.
Raising the dramatic question is really the main purpose of every concept.
But the mistake that many new writers do is to assume that the question raises itself.
That’s a huge mistake.
Just because someone was murdered, in a story, that doesn’t mean that the audience will automatically ask them selves; Who did it?
The dramatic question is something that the story should be carefully constructed to raise by how the setup works.
Only when If the goal is important enough and the obstacles are big enough and the threat is, threatening enough, will it cause the audience to raise that question, not before.
Here is an example of a concept with my breakdown of it:
THE HANGOVER
Three groomsmen lose their about-to-be-wed buddy during their drunken misadventures, then must retrace their steps in order to find him before the wedding in 24 hours.

My breakdown of the Logline:
The Dramatic question: Will they find their buddy before his wedding?
Their problem: They´ve lost their buddy
Their Goal: They must find him (this makes it a quest plot)
Their deficiency/handicap: They are drunk, they´ve lost their memory, they´ve only got 24 hours.

The threat: if they don´t find him, he will miss his wedding and possibly his marriage.
(once again a lot worse situation than their problem)


It can take a long time to come up with a concept that works, that raises the right question, that inspires us to wanna see how it turns out.
Dedicate a lot of your energy and time to make your Log line work.
But the beauty of working with concepts is that it doesn't take long to re-write one single sentence.
But if it DOESN’T work and you dive right into the screenplay, then you have to re-write a whole 120 page screenplay, which can take months rather than just changing that one single line and remedying the problem before you move on.
So that’s my professional advice to you; work on Loglines.
Write as many as you can then pick the best out of a 100.
Once you’ve accomplished that, re-write it until it works.
That’s how professional screenwriters work and so should you, if you want to learn the craft.
Good Luck!!!

The best advice I can give is to know your own writing process.
If you’ve never written ANYthing before, a speech, paper, or short story or article, know how you work and then find that groove in order to complete a script.
It helps to outline a cohesive story first and be as specific as you can.
Outline a scene and then try to write THAT scene.
Sometimes one scene can make you tell whether or not its an Idea you want to actually explore or leave.
Be sure to SAVE all your drafts and changes and all ideas so that you can see your evolution process and you can learn more.
It really is helpful I’ve found.
And finally, be prepared to edit A LOT.
Throw out lines and scenes that don’t work even though they may be the best thing you’ve ever written.
Save it and use it for something else later.
Be prepared for a lot of criticism and if your script gets made, be prepared for it to be re-written and changed A LOT even if you’re a part of the process.
Sometimes changes are a part of the collaborative experience and just plain necessary given restraints and story.
Find an Idea you’re committed to and passionate about, and then just write it.
Story is important, but find or tell a story YOU really want to get put out there and people to know and enjoy.
If you’re attached to a story or idea, you’re less likely to just leave it unfinished and move on.
My first script I wrote in high-school using Microsoft word and all it consisted of was some descriptions of scenes and shots and then all the dialogue for the characters.
Once I became comfortable with my own style of writing scripts I began to learn the “proper” way to do it and transferred my script to a formal (screenplay/script) form.
Guides for this can be found online, and definitions for the proper word and terms usages.
Also free templates can be found on some sites, that will help you do it for you.
And some sites give you writing tools and the template for a small one time fee if that’s what you’re interested in.
I do not recommend buying a script writing software as it just doesn’t seem cost effective to me.
If you sell a script or get something made and are cranking out scripts left and right, maybe then would be a good time to invest in that.
Hope this works!

After tons and tons of work.
It's next to impossible to begin writing the actual script before working out the plot, theme, what you want to say, who your characters are – not to mention researching.
This is due to the fact that screenplay pages are meant to be a film in a written form, and while in novels and prose in general, meandering and deepening the subject matter works, in films, everything has to be in constant movement – film is storytelling with movement, whether it's actual movement of characters, camera etc.
or “apparent” movement of cuts.
You can't keep things moving (or moving in the right direction) if your mind blanks out about important facets of your story.
Work them out as best as you can.
Jot down those exquisite lines, descriptions, and actions in a notebook, where they'll be waiting while you work out your story by outlining, mind mapping, and doing whatever else feels appropriate.
Good luck and perseverance!

Well, to begin with you should do some brainstorming before you actually begin to write something.
Remember it’s your first time, so be cautious enough to make your stuff entertaining enough and avoid unintended cliche.
The idea of getting recurring success based on some fixed ideology or concept can only work for some seasoned film maker.
So just make it a point that you stick to originality.
This does not mean you cannot use something that has influenced you for the lifetime.
The first and most important thing is to decide the character map.
Select a central character around which the whole story will be woven.
It’s easier to imagine and write screenplays that way, so there are no loose ends to the whole thing.
Writing a screenplay involving multiple central characters will turn up into a mess at some stage, so as a novice you should avoid it.
Now a key point to remember here is that you have to first decide the flow of the characters along the film and then create the scenes.
Once you’ve done with creation of scenes, it’s now time to add a complete personality to your characters.
I would recommend to always keep the personality to character mapping at last, as it gives you good creative freedom.
Write down all the nuances of all the characters in your script.
Always take a look at this data, before writing scenes and dialogues between your characters.
Finally compile all your scenes together to form a great screenplay.
No matter how good screenplay you write, the director is bound to make changes according to his comfort when he will direct the stuff.
So keep some fluidity while writing the scenes unless you are writing for a genre like thriller, crime drama, etc.
Finally if you are a novice and you have got very experience in writing, then always try to write some lightweight genre like romance or family drama.
As a novice, one shouldn’t try hand at crime dramas, sport dramas and never even think of writing comedies.
Once you’ve tried your luck 2–3 times, you can try experimenting with different genres.

If you don’t know how to write a movie script, then my advice to you, first and foremost, is to take a screenwriting class.
If you are not in Los Angeles or New York, that should not be a problem.
There are many online courses available.
I believe Gotham Writers Workshop has them available.
There are also loads of screenwriting classes available online through places like Teachable.
Just do a search for online screenwriting.
If you are in Los Angeles, you can take a Community College course or take a class through UCLA Extension.
What’s great about UCLA Extension is that you have actual screenwriters with solid credits teaching the courses.
If you do take a course, I would suggest taking one that teaches you how to write the first 10 pages or the first act of your screenplay.
Do not worry about learning the whole process in one course.
While there are courses that offer that option, I can tell you from experience and film development knowledge that the first 10 pages are the most important in your screenplay.
I worked as a Development Executive as well as a Reader.
There is a well-known rule in Hollywood: If the first 10 pages suck, then don’t bother with the rest of the script.
That harsh reality means that if I am not intrigued by the first 10 pages, your script will end up in the trash, either on my computer or in a recycling bin.
Now, before you feel that I am being mean, I can tell you that after reading hundreds of scripts, you want to pull your hair out if the writing is bad.
After thousands, you want to throw the script into a fire.
I realize that sounds harsh but Hollywood is harsh.
It is far better to know how people are going in than expecting to be welcomed with love, unicorns and butterflies that have banners exclaiming you are a great writer.
That does not even happen when you win an Oscar.
Another harsh truth is that your first few screenplays might not be perfect.
They might suck, but that is okay.
That is you learning how to write.
There is a story I used to hear in a TV writing course where a well-known show runner said that no script was good until it was on top of the pile of scripts on your floor that essentially reached your mid-calf.
He said that was the script he would read and it would most likely be the best-written one.
That means most likely script number seven, eight, nine or ten.
Therefore, learning the craft of screenwriting is essential.
Reading books helps a lot but nothing replaces going into a class or taking a class and truly learning about the process.
Hal Ackerman is a great screenwriting teacher.
I took two courses from him while I was at UCLA and one of the courses was simply watching the first ten minutes of films he felt were great for establishing character.
Then we would write an essay on those first ten minutes and finally, write our first ten pages of the screenplay.
I learned more in that course than I learned in many of my undergrad classes.
The second writing course I would recommend is learning how to write a proper first act of your screenplay.
Yes, that is it.
Three months on 30 pages; but guess what? You should have a solid 30 pages.
I can’t impress upon you how important having a strong opening and first act are.
It can make or break your screenplay.
The reason for this is that if the reader or executive or assistant has just invested at least 30 minutes of his or her life, then he or she believes this script has potential.
That is the only way your entire script will be read.
The other important thing is to buy some screenplays of movies that you like.
Read them like you are reading a book.
See the difference between screenwriting and novel writing.
The main difference is the format and the fact that screenwriting is sparse.
You need to pack everything, emotions, dialogue and action into one to three pages of a scene.
In a novel, you can take five or ten pages to write the same thing.
Learning to be a good storyteller with very little language is an art form.
Another thing you should know is that if you do not properly format your screenplay, it won’t get read.
A nice person might let you know you need to format it correctly.
Most people will just toss it.
This is why a beginning screenwriting class is so good.
You will spend quite a while learning how to format things.
It is not a waste of time, it is essential to being a good screenwriter.
Before anyone feels too put upon to learn the formatting, think about this: when I first took a screenwriting course in the early 1990s, I had to type all my scenes on my IBM Selectric typewriter.
I actually had to learn how to set tabs on it.
You also need screenwriting software.
As Madeleine said below, get Final Draft.
Now, I have a definite ambivalence to Final Draft.
I think it is clunky and not as intuitive as it could be.
I also think their key code method is ridiculous.
If you change computers, you have to change the key code.
If you want to write on two different computers, it costs you more money.
They are also very expensive.
However, they tend to be the industry standard.
That said, a lot of my writer friends use other scriptwriting software.
It just depends.
If you take a course, you should find out which one you need before you invest.
I think the free software is a waste of your time.
It never does what you need it to do.
Finally, I would look at some old editions of Written By, the WGAWest magazine.
There are a lot of great interviews.
You can learn a lot about screenwriting by listening to writers talk about their craft.
One last thing, when you are done writing, always register your script with the Writer’s Guild.
You can do it online.
You can also copyright it as well.
Good luck!

Well, i guess i get moved many a times
This is how many a stories have taken birth in me.
Not every story has been made in to a film.
But yes, about twenty five to thirty stories of mine have been made in to films.
Either by other directors or by me.

I think when writing a script a good decision is to follow the best practices of successful screenwriters.
For example, everyone know Tarantino, right? His new movie Hateful Eight has just come out.

Well, the main techniques that Tarantino uses include the following:
1) Mirroring – reading the script aloud to a friend to hear it "from another side"
2) Telling the Truth – the characters should be themselves, don't make them do what they wouldn't do
3) Tangential Scenes – write dialogues that may not develop the plot but establish the characters.
4) Distance Helps – write a really long script, put it away, edit it in 6 months.
Here's an image and a nice article that illustrates all of these tips:

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

You start with an idea, a concept.
– Also called a Logline
Come up with a setup for a story that you can tell in a sentence of 35 words or less and make sure it works.
A great concept for a story is the foundation for everything that follows and it should consist of;
A story setup should inspire the reader to raise one specific question that we want to know the answer to.
And that question is what we call the “The Dramatic Question”
Will E.
T come home? Will Indiana Jones find the lost Ark? are examples of such questions.
They are the driving force of any plot and so it’s one of the most important thing that a functional story concept must do; to raise that specific question.
Raising the dramatic question is really the main purpose of every concept.
But the mistake that many new writers do is to assume that the question raises itself.
That’s a huge mistake.
Just because someone was murdered, in a story, that doesn’t mean that the audience will automatically ask them selves; Who did it?
The dramatic question is something that the story should be carefully constructed to raise by how the setup works.
Only when If the goal is important enough and the obstacles are big enough and the threat is, threatening enough, will it cause the audience to raise that question, not before.
Here is an example of a concept with my breakdown of it:
THE HANGOVER
Three groomsmen lose their about-to-be-wed buddy during their drunken misadventures, then must retrace their steps in order to find him before the wedding in 24 hours.

My breakdown of the Logline:
The Dramatic question: Will they find their buddy before his wedding?
Their problem: They´ve lost their buddy
Their Goal: They must find him (this makes it a quest plot)
Their deficiency/handicap: They are drunk, they´ve lost their memory, they´ve only got 24 hours.

The threat: if they don´t find him, he will miss his wedding and possibly his marriage.
(once again a lot worse situation than their problem)


It can take a long time to come up with a concept that works, that raises the right question, that inspires us to wanna see how it turns out.
Dedicate a lot of your energy and time to make your Log line work.
But the beauty of working with concepts is that it doesn't take long to re-write one single sentence.
But if it DOESN’T work and you dive right into the screenplay, then you have to re-write a whole 120 page screenplay, which can take months rather than just changing that one single line and remedying the problem before you move on.
So that’s my professional advice to you; work on Loglines.
Write as many as you can then pick the best out of a 100.
Once you’ve accomplished that, re-write it until it works.
That’s how professional screenwriters work and so should you, if you want to learn the craft.
Good Luck!!!

How do I write a movie?

Though I have written a couple of scripts which are yet to be validated by the producers to go into production phase, I want to share my own experience with you.
1: Difference between story and script.
Do you want to write a story or a script? Be clear about it because both are different and both are difficult for the novices.
Let us see what are the main differences between these two.
Story: Requires genre, story line, characterization, premise, a starting, a middle, and an apt ending.
The main objective of a story is to TELL about how the characters feel while things are happening to them, and how the characters are reacting and overcoming them.
Hence, story writing mostly involves psychological perception of characters towards a certain situation.
Script: the other name of script is screenplay, which literally means what are you going to play on the screen? A story is to TELL and a screenplay is to SHOW.
Without a story, you can't write a script.
And without a script, you can't shoot or even explain a scene in a simple manner to actors or other crew members on the sets.
So, without a good screenplay, a director will fail to direct the team in successful direction.
So both story and screenplay are different.
And in film making both are important.
In Hollywood, most of the script writers are not story writers, but in bollywood it is not so.
Now that we know this difference, let's move to step 2.
2: Goal and method of script writing.
Film makers goal: To give a product of 120 minutes of audio/video to audience.
How good is that product depends almost on all the factors right from story to final mixing.
Script writers goal: To mould the story in the hand into a proper document.
This document will serve as a blueprint for the entire production and post production of the movie.
How is this done?
A) Divide the story into scenes.
(Note: A scene is a part of a story which happens at one location at one time.
Generally a commercial movie has around 60 to 70 scenes.
)
B) Divide the scenes into sub scenes.
(A scene may sometimes be lengthy and may also involve two or three locations like that of a telephonic coversation between friends, then the scenes need to be divided into sub scenes as they cannot be shot at one time.
)
C) Divide scenes/subscenes into shots.
A shot will guide the team on framing aspect of a scene.
Generally a scene starts with a very wide/wide frame to tell the audience about where it is taking place.
And then it gradually moves to mid frame, and to close ups and extreme close ups at times.
D) Start every scene with proper scene no, location, time.
Ex: Scene 5 Location: Market Time: Morning
E) Start with proper scene description.
Start every sentence in a new line.
Most of the times, one sentence in the script will require one shot.
Ex:
There was a market.
People were busy buying and selling vegetables at various shops.
Bunty was observing the shops and the people.
F) Before a particular dialogue, write the character’s name.
Ex:
Bunty to shop owner
Uncle, yeh kaddu kite ka hain?
Shop owner
Ek kaddu 20 rupay.
Bunty
Par baajoo shop me tho 10 ko hi Mil raha hain.
Shop owner
Tho wahi pe khareed na, yaha pe kyu aaya.
Chal footle yaha se.
3.
Honing the script writing skills

A) Before you write a script, download and read some scripts from internet.
This will give you an idea of what a script is and how it looks like.
B) Read at least 1 to 2 books on script writing to gain exceptional clarity on the process.
Sometimes, though there is a story in your hands, you might wonder about how to present in in a visual format to audience, as they might be lacking dialogues, intervals etc.
These books are there to guide you.
One book that I personally like is Save the Cat by Blake Snyder.
It is simple and easy to understand.
C) Watch movies and observe how the scenes are shot.
One is an action scene, and the other one a love and then there is a comdey scene.
Take a love scene for instance, observe how hero looked at heroine, how well she smiled and lowered her eye lids, then how he came near her, and then how she shied and turned away.
Each shot is a part of script written by some screen writer somewhere.
So, observe as much as possible and try to understand how it would have been written.
D) Though reading and observing are good, there is definitely no replacement for doing.
Why don't you write a script for a small story today? And check whether your script is really helping your team in the process of film making.
If no one is ready to shoot your script, why don't you yourself go ahead and make it and check where you stand as a script writer?
All the best!

First Understand what a script is.
The script, or screenplay, outlines all of the elements (audio, visual, behavior, and dialogue) that are required to tell a story through movies or TV.
Read the scripts of some of your favorite movies.
Find movie scripts online and decide what you like (and don’t like) about them.
Get a feel for how the action is portrayed, dialogue is written, and characters are developed.
Flesh out your concept.
Assuming you already have an idea you want to write about, sketch out all the necessary plot details, relationships, and personality traits that will guide your story.
Outline your story.
Begin with a basic flow of your narrative.
Focus on the conflict of the story; conflict drives drama.
Write your story in three acts.
The pillars of a screenplay are the Three Acts.
Each act can operate independently, and when taken together provide the full arc of a story.

Permit me to answer your question with a true story from real movie history life.
The purpose for this explanatory method is to clearly illustrate and fully substantiate the answer I shall herein provide for you.
Mario Puzo had never written a script for a movie.
He was a novelist.
When a novel he wrote entitled The Godfather became a bestseller, Paramount Studios bought the film rights to the book and wanted Mario to assist a young and as yet unknown director with adapting the novel into a screenplay for the motion picture version of The Godfather.
The reason Paramount hired the young unknown director was because said director was willing to work for a mere pittance, a paltry stipends, of a paycheck.
That director’s name was Francis Ford Coppola.
After the blockbuster box office success of The Godfather movie, Hollywood wanted a sequel and of course they wanted Mario to assist Francis with writing the screenplay for the second film.
Mario didn’t know how to write a screenplay, so he went to the bookstore where he purchased an instructional manual which provided information explaining, according to the industry standards of that era, how to write a script for a movie.
When he got home and opened the manual, there on page one he read that in order to gain an understanding of how to write a screenplay, one should examine Mario Puzo’s The Godfather.

This true life parable effectively demonstrates that in order to write a script for a movie, one should first write a bestselling novel.
The Old Salts of commercial fishing boats often quote a saying that has its origins in the distant mist-shrouded depths of the ancient maritime past.
The briny Old Salts say, “The more you fish, the luckier you are.

Therefore, the more you write, the greater success you’ll have with writing scripts for movies.
So, there’s another place for you to start writing scripts for movies.
The place to start is by writing every day and every night.
I congratulate you on your admirable ambition to be a successful award-winning script writer! I look forward to seeing your name listed when the credits roll!

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How should I get over this problem?

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What should I start doing and how should I lead my life in order to succeed in the field?

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Nofilmschool
2.
Indiwire
3.
Lightfilmschool
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Ashok Kumar's answer to What are some great writing exercises for screenwriters?
Ashok Kumar's answer to I joined the creative writing club but I am not very good at writing, only coming up with ideas.
How should I get over this problem?

Ashok Kumar's answer to I want to be a screenwriter.
What should I start doing and how should I lead my life in order to succeed in the field?

Just like every car has four wheels and two axles, each screenplay has the same basic structural parts – the nuts and bolts – to make it work.
However, there is a huge difference between a two passenger Smart Car and a ‘64 Cobra 289.
Both will get you to your final destination, but the ride will be a completely different experience.

Screenwriting is like car building.
It’s a trade.
It uses a very specific format, follows a universal structure, and must meet audience expectations.
To do otherwise, is suicide.

Imagine the automobile industry installing wheels on the roof of cars.
Nobody wants to drive upside down.
Screenwriting works the same way.
There is a blueprint – structured through acts, sequences, and plot points – that almost every movie follows.
This is the science of the screenplay, the dramaturgy, but science is only a part of cinematic story telling.
Of course every great screenplay must have a solid structural foundation, but it is also essential to write with an original voice and have a powerful, and hopefully topical, concept with incredibly interesting, flawed, and empathetic characters – and all of this must be in proper screenplay form.

To think of The Formula as a recipe to write your great Hollywood script using structure alone would be shortsighted.
Structure without character, character without story, story without voice, and voice without form.
.
.
it simply doesn’t work.
The Formula is only as strong as it’s weakest link, so in order for you to be a successful screenwriter, you must achieve all five parts: CHARACTER, STORY, STRUCTURE, VOICE, and FORM.
The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting provides the essential pieces you need to construct a sellable script, regardless of genre.
But it is essential to understand that The Formula is never about being formulaic.
There is nothing conventional about creating interesting, believable, and unique characters, nor is there any paint-by-number directions to germinate and develop an original story, and even though three act structure has rules to guide you, it’s all very flexible.
Nothing is set in stone.

So whether this is your first screenplay or you’ve been writing for years, you’ve come the right place.
This online version of The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting, was built as completely searchable resource to guide you through journey of building a screenplay from the beginning, or answer specific questions that might pop up during the development process.

Enjoy, Good Luck, and Get Started

———————————————————————————————

Quite off topic, but I have just won a free iohawk hoverboard, I already got one , probably gonna give it to my brother's son.
Check the website yourself, they are giving one every week.

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

The best advice I can give is to know your own writing process.
If you’ve never written ANYthing before, a speech, paper, or short story or article, know how you work and then find that groove in order to complete a script.
It helps to outline a cohesive story first and be as specific as you can.
Outline a scene and then try to write THAT scene.
Sometimes one scene can make you tell whether or not its an Idea you want to actually explore or leave.
Be sure to SAVE all your drafts and changes and all ideas so that you can see your evolution process and you can learn more.
It really is helpful I’ve found.
And finally, be prepared to edit A LOT.
Throw out lines and scenes that don’t work even though they may be the best thing you’ve ever written.
Save it and use it for something else later.
Be prepared for a lot of criticism and if your script gets made, be prepared for it to be re-written and changed A LOT even if you’re a part of the process.
Sometimes changes are a part of the collaborative experience and just plain necessary given restraints and story.
Find an Idea you’re committed to and passionate about, and then just write it.
Story is important, but find or tell a story YOU really want to get put out there and people to know and enjoy.
If you’re attached to a story or idea, you’re less likely to just leave it unfinished and move on.
My first script I wrote in high-school using Microsoft word and all it consisted of was some descriptions of scenes and shots and then all the dialogue for the characters.
Once I became comfortable with my own style of writing scripts I began to learn the “proper” way to do it and transferred my script to a formal (screenplay/script) form.
Guides for this can be found online, and definitions for the proper word and terms usages.
Also free templates can be found on some sites, that will help you do it for you.
And some sites give you writing tools and the template for a small one time fee if that’s what you’re interested in.
I do not recommend buying a script writing software as it just doesn’t seem cost effective to me.
If you sell a script or get something made and are cranking out scripts left and right, maybe then would be a good time to invest in that.
Hope this works!

How do I write a movie?

Though I have written a couple of scripts which are yet to be validated by the producers to go into production phase, I want to share my own experience with you.
1: Difference between story and script.
Do you want to write a story or a script? Be clear about it because both are different and both are difficult for the novices.
Let us see what are the main differences between these two.
Story: Requires genre, story line, characterization, premise, a starting, a middle, and an apt ending.
The main objective of a story is to TELL about how the characters feel while things are happening to them, and how the characters are reacting and overcoming them.
Hence, story writing mostly involves psychological perception of characters towards a certain situation.
Script: the other name of script is screenplay, which literally means what are you going to play on the screen? A story is to TELL and a screenplay is to SHOW.
Without a story, you can't write a script.
And without a script, you can't shoot or even explain a scene in a simple manner to actors or other crew members on the sets.
So, without a good screenplay, a director will fail to direct the team in successful direction.
So both story and screenplay are different.
And in film making both are important.
In Hollywood, most of the script writers are not story writers, but in bollywood it is not so.
Now that we know this difference, let's move to step 2.
2: Goal and method of script writing.
Film makers goal: To give a product of 120 minutes of audio/video to audience.
How good is that product depends almost on all the factors right from story to final mixing.
Script writers goal: To mould the story in the hand into a proper document.
This document will serve as a blueprint for the entire production and post production of the movie.
How is this done?
A) Divide the story into scenes.
(Note: A scene is a part of a story which happens at one location at one time.
Generally a commercial movie has around 60 to 70 scenes.
)
B) Divide the scenes into sub scenes.
(A scene may sometimes be lengthy and may also involve two or three locations like that of a telephonic coversation between friends, then the scenes need to be divided into sub scenes as they cannot be shot at one time.
)
C) Divide scenes/subscenes into shots.
A shot will guide the team on framing aspect of a scene.
Generally a scene starts with a very wide/wide frame to tell the audience about where it is taking place.
And then it gradually moves to mid frame, and to close ups and extreme close ups at times.
D) Start every scene with proper scene no, location, time.
Ex: Scene 5 Location: Market Time: Morning
E) Start with proper scene description.
Start every sentence in a new line.
Most of the times, one sentence in the script will require one shot.
Ex:
There was a market.
People were busy buying and selling vegetables at various shops.
Bunty was observing the shops and the people.
F) Before a particular dialogue, write the character’s name.
Ex:
Bunty to shop owner
Uncle, yeh kaddu kite ka hain?
Shop owner
Ek kaddu 20 rupay.
Bunty
Par baajoo shop me tho 10 ko hi Mil raha hain.
Shop owner
Tho wahi pe khareed na, yaha pe kyu aaya.
Chal footle yaha se.
3.
Honing the script writing skills

A) Before you write a script, download and read some scripts from internet.
This will give you an idea of what a script is and how it looks like.
B) Read at least 1 to 2 books on script writing to gain exceptional clarity on the process.
Sometimes, though there is a story in your hands, you might wonder about how to present in in a visual format to audience, as they might be lacking dialogues, intervals etc.
These books are there to guide you.
One book that I personally like is Save the Cat by Blake Snyder.
It is simple and easy to understand.
C) Watch movies and observe how the scenes are shot.
One is an action scene, and the other one a love and then there is a comdey scene.
Take a love scene for instance, observe how hero looked at heroine, how well she smiled and lowered her eye lids, then how he came near her, and then how she shied and turned away.
Each shot is a part of script written by some screen writer somewhere.
So, observe as much as possible and try to understand how it would have been written.
D) Though reading and observing are good, there is definitely no replacement for doing.
Why don't you write a script for a small story today? And check whether your script is really helping your team in the process of film making.
If no one is ready to shoot your script, why don't you yourself go ahead and make it and check where you stand as a script writer?
All the best!

First Understand what a script is.
The script, or screenplay, outlines all of the elements (audio, visual, behavior, and dialogue) that are required to tell a story through movies or TV.
Read the scripts of some of your favorite movies.
Find movie scripts online and decide what you like (and don’t like) about them.
Get a feel for how the action is portrayed, dialogue is written, and characters are developed.
Flesh out your concept.
Assuming you already have an idea you want to write about, sketch out all the necessary plot details, relationships, and personality traits that will guide your story.
Outline your story.
Begin with a basic flow of your narrative.
Focus on the conflict of the story; conflict drives drama.
Write your story in three acts.
The pillars of a screenplay are the Three Acts.
Each act can operate independently, and when taken together provide the full arc of a story.

Permit me to answer your question with a true story from real movie history life.
The purpose for this explanatory method is to clearly illustrate and fully substantiate the answer I shall herein provide for you.
Mario Puzo had never written a script for a movie.
He was a novelist.
When a novel he wrote entitled The Godfather became a bestseller, Paramount Studios bought the film rights to the book and wanted Mario to assist a young and as yet unknown director with adapting the novel into a screenplay for the motion picture version of The Godfather.
The reason Paramount hired the young unknown director was because said director was willing to work for a mere pittance, a paltry stipends, of a paycheck.
That director’s name was Francis Ford Coppola.
After the blockbuster box office success of The Godfather movie, Hollywood wanted a sequel and of course they wanted Mario to assist Francis with writing the screenplay for the second film.
Mario didn’t know how to write a screenplay, so he went to the bookstore where he purchased an instructional manual which provided information explaining, according to the industry standards of that era, how to write a script for a movie.
When he got home and opened the manual, there on page one he read that in order to gain an understanding of how to write a screenplay, one should examine Mario Puzo’s The Godfather.

This true life parable effectively demonstrates that in order to write a script for a movie, one should first write a bestselling novel.
The Old Salts of commercial fishing boats often quote a saying that has its origins in the distant mist-shrouded depths of the ancient maritime past.
The briny Old Salts say, “The more you fish, the luckier you are.

Therefore, the more you write, the greater success you’ll have with writing scripts for movies.
So, there’s another place for you to start writing scripts for movies.
The place to start is by writing every day and every night.
I congratulate you on your admirable ambition to be a successful award-winning script writer! I look forward to seeing your name listed when the credits roll!

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Ashok Kumar's answer to I want to be a screenwriter.
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Ashok Kumar's answer to What are some great writing exercises for screenwriters?
Ashok Kumar's answer to I joined the creative writing club but I am not very good at writing, only coming up with ideas.
How should I get over this problem?

Ashok Kumar's answer to I want to be a screenwriter.
What should I start doing and how should I lead my life in order to succeed in the field?

Just like every car has four wheels and two axles, each screenplay has the same basic structural parts – the nuts and bolts – to make it work.
However, there is a huge difference between a two passenger Smart Car and a ‘64 Cobra 289.
Both will get you to your final destination, but the ride will be a completely different experience.

Screenwriting is like car building.
It’s a trade.
It uses a very specific format, follows a universal structure, and must meet audience expectations.
To do otherwise, is suicide.

Imagine the automobile industry installing wheels on the roof of cars.
Nobody wants to drive upside down.
Screenwriting works the same way.
There is a blueprint – structured through acts, sequences, and plot points – that almost every movie follows.
This is the science of the screenplay, the dramaturgy, but science is only a part of cinematic story telling.
Of course every great screenplay must have a solid structural foundation, but it is also essential to write with an original voice and have a powerful, and hopefully topical, concept with incredibly interesting, flawed, and empathetic characters – and all of this must be in proper screenplay form.

To think of The Formula as a recipe to write your great Hollywood script using structure alone would be shortsighted.
Structure without character, character without story, story without voice, and voice without form.
.
.
it simply doesn’t work.
The Formula is only as strong as it’s weakest link, so in order for you to be a successful screenwriter, you must achieve all five parts: CHARACTER, STORY, STRUCTURE, VOICE, and FORM.
The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting provides the essential pieces you need to construct a sellable script, regardless of genre.
But it is essential to understand that The Formula is never about being formulaic.
There is nothing conventional about creating interesting, believable, and unique characters, nor is there any paint-by-number directions to germinate and develop an original story, and even though three act structure has rules to guide you, it’s all very flexible.
Nothing is set in stone.

So whether this is your first screenplay or you’ve been writing for years, you’ve come the right place.
This online version of The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting, was built as completely searchable resource to guide you through journey of building a screenplay from the beginning, or answer specific questions that might pop up during the development process.

Enjoy, Good Luck, and Get Started

———————————————————————————————

Quite off topic, but I have just won a free iohawk hoverboard, I already got one , probably gonna give it to my brother's son.
Check the website yourself, they are giving one every week.

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

The best advice I can give is to know your own writing process.
If you’ve never written ANYthing before, a speech, paper, or short story or article, know how you work and then find that groove in order to complete a script.
It helps to outline a cohesive story first and be as specific as you can.
Outline a scene and then try to write THAT scene.
Sometimes one scene can make you tell whether or not its an Idea you want to actually explore or leave.
Be sure to SAVE all your drafts and changes and all ideas so that you can see your evolution process and you can learn more.
It really is helpful I’ve found.
And finally, be prepared to edit A LOT.
Throw out lines and scenes that don’t work even though they may be the best thing you’ve ever written.
Save it and use it for something else later.
Be prepared for a lot of criticism and if your script gets made, be prepared for it to be re-written and changed A LOT even if you’re a part of the process.
Sometimes changes are a part of the collaborative experience and just plain necessary given restraints and story.
Find an Idea you’re committed to and passionate about, and then just write it.
Story is important, but find or tell a story YOU really want to get put out there and people to know and enjoy.
If you’re attached to a story or idea, you’re less likely to just leave it unfinished and move on.
My first script I wrote in high-school using Microsoft word and all it consisted of was some descriptions of scenes and shots and then all the dialogue for the characters.
Once I became comfortable with my own style of writing scripts I began to learn the “proper” way to do it and transferred my script to a formal (screenplay/script) form.
Guides for this can be found online, and definitions for the proper word and terms usages.
Also free templates can be found on some sites, that will help you do it for you.
And some sites give you writing tools and the template for a small one time fee if that’s what you’re interested in.
I do not recommend buying a script writing software as it just doesn’t seem cost effective to me.
If you sell a script or get something made and are cranking out scripts left and right, maybe then would be a good time to invest in that.
Hope this works!

After tons and tons of work.
It's next to impossible to begin writing the actual script before working out the plot, theme, what you want to say, who your characters are – not to mention researching.
This is due to the fact that screenplay pages are meant to be a film in a written form, and while in novels and prose in general, meandering and deepening the subject matter works, in films, everything has to be in constant movement – film is storytelling with movement, whether it's actual movement of characters, camera etc.
or “apparent” movement of cuts.
You can't keep things moving (or moving in the right direction) if your mind blanks out about important facets of your story.
Work them out as best as you can.
Jot down those exquisite lines, descriptions, and actions in a notebook, where they'll be waiting while you work out your story by outlining, mind mapping, and doing whatever else feels appropriate.
Good luck and perseverance!

Well, to begin with you should do some brainstorming before you actually begin to write something.
Remember it’s your first time, so be cautious enough to make your stuff entertaining enough and avoid unintended cliche.
The idea of getting recurring success based on some fixed ideology or concept can only work for some seasoned film maker.
So just make it a point that you stick to originality.
This does not mean you cannot use something that has influenced you for the lifetime.
The first and most important thing is to decide the character map.
Select a central character around which the whole story will be woven.
It’s easier to imagine and write screenplays that way, so there are no loose ends to the whole thing.
Writing a screenplay involving multiple central characters will turn up into a mess at some stage, so as a novice you should avoid it.
Now a key point to remember here is that you have to first decide the flow of the characters along the film and then create the scenes.
Once you’ve done with creation of scenes, it’s now time to add a complete personality to your characters.
I would recommend to always keep the personality to character mapping at last, as it gives you good creative freedom.
Write down all the nuances of all the characters in your script.
Always take a look at this data, before writing scenes and dialogues between your characters.
Finally compile all your scenes together to form a great screenplay.
No matter how good screenplay you write, the director is bound to make changes according to his comfort when he will direct the stuff.
So keep some fluidity while writing the scenes unless you are writing for a genre like thriller, crime drama, etc.
Finally if you are a novice and you have got very experience in writing, then always try to write some lightweight genre like romance or family drama.
As a novice, one shouldn’t try hand at crime dramas, sport dramas and never even think of writing comedies.
Once you’ve tried your luck 2–3 times, you can try experimenting with different genres.

If you don’t know how to write a movie script, then my advice to you, first and foremost, is to take a screenwriting class.
If you are not in Los Angeles or New York, that should not be a problem.
There are many online courses available.
I believe Gotham Writers Workshop has them available.
There are also loads of screenwriting classes available online through places like Teachable.
Just do a search for online screenwriting.
If you are in Los Angeles, you can take a Community College course or take a class through UCLA Extension.
What’s great about UCLA Extension is that you have actual screenwriters with solid credits teaching the courses.
If you do take a course, I would suggest taking one that teaches you how to write the first 10 pages or the first act of your screenplay.
Do not worry about learning the whole process in one course.
While there are courses that offer that option, I can tell you from experience and film development knowledge that the first 10 pages are the most important in your screenplay.
I worked as a Development Executive as well as a Reader.
There is a well-known rule in Hollywood: If the first 10 pages suck, then don’t bother with the rest of the script.
That harsh reality means that if I am not intrigued by the first 10 pages, your script will end up in the trash, either on my computer or in a recycling bin.
Now, before you feel that I am being mean, I can tell you that after reading hundreds of scripts, you want to pull your hair out if the writing is bad.
After thousands, you want to throw the script into a fire.
I realize that sounds harsh but Hollywood is harsh.
It is far better to know how people are going in than expecting to be welcomed with love, unicorns and butterflies that have banners exclaiming you are a great writer.
That does not even happen when you win an Oscar.
Another harsh truth is that your first few screenplays might not be perfect.
They might suck, but that is okay.
That is you learning how to write.
There is a story I used to hear in a TV writing course where a well-known show runner said that no script was good until it was on top of the pile of scripts on your floor that essentially reached your mid-calf.
He said that was the script he would read and it would most likely be the best-written one.
That means most likely script number seven, eight, nine or ten.
Therefore, learning the craft of screenwriting is essential.
Reading books helps a lot but nothing replaces going into a class or taking a class and truly learning about the process.
Hal Ackerman is a great screenwriting teacher.
I took two courses from him while I was at UCLA and one of the courses was simply watching the first ten minutes of films he felt were great for establishing character.
Then we would write an essay on those first ten minutes and finally, write our first ten pages of the screenplay.
I learned more in that course than I learned in many of my undergrad classes.
The second writing course I would recommend is learning how to write a proper first act of your screenplay.
Yes, that is it.
Three months on 30 pages; but guess what? You should have a solid 30 pages.
I can’t impress upon you how important having a strong opening and first act are.
It can make or break your screenplay.
The reason for this is that if the reader or executive or assistant has just invested at least 30 minutes of his or her life, then he or she believes this script has potential.
That is the only way your entire script will be read.
The other important thing is to buy some screenplays of movies that you like.
Read them like you are reading a book.
See the difference between screenwriting and novel writing.
The main difference is the format and the fact that screenwriting is sparse.
You need to pack everything, emotions, dialogue and action into one to three pages of a scene.
In a novel, you can take five or ten pages to write the same thing.
Learning to be a good storyteller with very little language is an art form.
Another thing you should know is that if you do not properly format your screenplay, it won’t get read.
A nice person might let you know you need to format it correctly.
Most people will just toss it.
This is why a beginning screenwriting class is so good.
You will spend quite a while learning how to format things.
It is not a waste of time, it is essential to being a good screenwriter.
Before anyone feels too put upon to learn the formatting, think about this: when I first took a screenwriting course in the early 1990s, I had to type all my scenes on my IBM Selectric typewriter.
I actually had to learn how to set tabs on it.
You also need screenwriting software.
As Madeleine said below, get Final Draft.
Now, I have a definite ambivalence to Final Draft.
I think it is clunky and not as intuitive as it could be.
I also think their key code method is ridiculous.
If you change computers, you have to change the key code.
If you want to write on two different computers, it costs you more money.
They are also very expensive.
However, they tend to be the industry standard.
That said, a lot of my writer friends use other scriptwriting software.
It just depends.
If you take a course, you should find out which one you need before you invest.
I think the free software is a waste of your time.
It never does what you need it to do.
Finally, I would look at some old editions of Written By, the WGAWest magazine.
There are a lot of great interviews.
You can learn a lot about screenwriting by listening to writers talk about their craft.
One last thing, when you are done writing, always register your script with the Writer’s Guild.
You can do it online.
You can also copyright it as well.
Good luck!

Well, i guess i get moved many a times
This is how many a stories have taken birth in me.
Not every story has been made in to a film.
But yes, about twenty five to thirty stories of mine have been made in to films.
Either by other directors or by me.

I think when writing a script a good decision is to follow the best practices of successful screenwriters.
For example, everyone know Tarantino, right? His new movie Hateful Eight has just come out.

Well, the main techniques that Tarantino uses include the following:
1) Mirroring – reading the script aloud to a friend to hear it "from another side"
2) Telling the Truth – the characters should be themselves, don't make them do what they wouldn't do
3) Tangential Scenes – write dialogues that may not develop the plot but establish the characters.
4) Distance Helps – write a really long script, put it away, edit it in 6 months.
Here's an image and a nice article that illustrates all of these tips:
Written Oct 17
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Ashok Kumar's answer to What are some great writing exercises for screenwriters?
Ashok Kumar's answer to I joined the creative writing club but I am not very good at writing, only coming up with ideas.
How should I get over this problem?

Ashok Kumar's answer to I want to be a screenwriter.
What should I start doing and how should I lead my life in order to succeed in the field?

Just like every car has four wheels and two axles, each screenplay has the same basic structural parts – the nuts and bolts – to make it work.
However, there is a huge difference between a two passenger Smart Car and a ‘64 Cobra 289.
Both will get you to your final destination, but the ride will be a completely different experience.

Screenwriting is like car building.
It’s a trade.
It uses a very specific format, follows a universal structure, and must meet audience expectations.
To do otherwise, is suicide.

Imagine the automobile industry installing wheels on the roof of cars.
Nobody wants to drive upside down.
Screenwriting works the same way.
There is a blueprint – structured through acts, sequences, and plot points – that almost every movie follows.
This is the science of the screenplay, the dramaturgy, but science is only a part of cinematic story telling.
Of course every great screenplay must have a solid structural foundation, but it is also essential to write with an original voice and have a powerful, and hopefully topical, concept with incredibly interesting, flawed, and empathetic characters – and all of this must be in proper screenplay form.

To think of The Formula as a recipe to write your great Hollywood script using structure alone would be shortsighted.
Structure without character, character without story, story without voice, and voice without form.
.
.
it simply doesn’t work.
The Formula is only as strong as it’s weakest link, so in order for you to be a successful screenwriter, you must achieve all five parts: CHARACTER, STORY, STRUCTURE, VOICE, and FORM.
The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting provides the essential pieces you need to construct a sellable script, regardless of genre.
But it is essential to understand that The Formula is never about being formulaic.
There is nothing conventional about creating interesting, believable, and unique characters, nor is there any paint-by-number directions to germinate and develop an original story, and even though three act structure has rules to guide you, it’s all very flexible.
Nothing is set in stone.

So whether this is your first screenplay or you’ve been writing for years, you’ve come the right place.
This online version of The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting, was built as completely searchable resource to guide you through journey of building a screenplay from the beginning, or answer specific questions that might pop up during the development process.

Enjoy, Good Luck, and Get Started

———————————————————————————————

Quite off topic, but I have just won a free iohawk hoverboard, I already got one , probably gonna give it to my brother's son.
Check the website yourself, they are giving one every week.

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
Written Oct 17
1.
Nofilmschool
2.
Indiwire
3.
Lightfilmschool
4.
FilmmakingHQ
Ashok Kumar's answer to What are some great writing exercises for screenwriters?
Ashok Kumar's answer to I joined the creative writing club but I am not very good at writing, only coming up with ideas.
How should I get over this problem?

Ashok Kumar's answer to I want to be a screenwriter.
What should I start doing and how should I lead my life in order to succeed in the field?

Just like every car has four wheels and two axles, each screenplay has the same basic structural parts – the nuts and bolts – to make it work.
However, there is a huge difference between a two passenger Smart Car and a ‘64 Cobra 289.
Both will get you to your final destination, but the ride will be a completely different experience.

Screenwriting is like car building.
It’s a trade.
It uses a very specific format, follows a universal structure, and must meet audience expectations.
To do otherwise, is suicide.

Imagine the automobile industry installing wheels on the roof of cars.
Nobody wants to drive upside down.
Screenwriting works the same way.
There is a blueprint – structured through acts, sequences, and plot points – that almost every movie follows.
This is the science of the screenplay, the dramaturgy, but science is only a part of cinematic story telling.
Of course every great screenplay must have a solid structural foundation, but it is also essential to write with an original voice and have a powerful, and hopefully topical, concept with incredibly interesting, flawed, and empathetic characters – and all of this must be in proper screenplay form.

To think of The Formula as a recipe to write your great Hollywood script using structure alone would be shortsighted.
Structure without character, character without story, story without voice, and voice without form.
.
.
it simply doesn’t work.
The Formula is only as strong as it’s weakest link, so in order for you to be a successful screenwriter, you must achieve all five parts: CHARACTER, STORY, STRUCTURE, VOICE, and FORM.
The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting provides the essential pieces you need to construct a sellable script, regardless of genre.
But it is essential to understand that The Formula is never about being formulaic.
There is nothing conventional about creating interesting, believable, and unique characters, nor is there any paint-by-number directions to germinate and develop an original story, and even though three act structure has rules to guide you, it’s all very flexible.
Nothing is set in stone.

So whether this is your first screenplay or you’ve been writing for years, you’ve come the right place.
This online version of The Formula: Introduction to Screenwriting, was built as completely searchable resource to guide you through journey of building a screenplay from the beginning, or answer specific questions that might pop up during the development process.

Enjoy, Good Luck, and Get Started

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Quite off topic, but I have just won a free iohawk hoverboard, I already got one , probably gonna give it to my brother's son.
Check the website yourself, they are giving one every week.

The point of the treatment is to communicate your story as quickly as possible, so brevity without sacrificing what makes it unique or worth gaining 'buy-in' from stakeholders
Most script-writers I know start with a one page pitch.
Then if they gain positive feedback, if they create a two to five page document that tells the whole story with important scenes sometimes dot pointed for clarity.
Then, if required, to flesh it out before starting the first draft, a lengthy document that is a scene by scene breakdown of a script.
Or a loosely drawn story board
A professional treatment usually has:
The tradition of writing in three act structure comes from the theater and is still followed by film-makers.
Act 1 : The Set-up, The situation and characters and conflict are introduced.
This classically is 30 minutes long.
Act 2 : The Conflict, often an hour long, is where the conflict begins and expands until it reaches a crisis.
Act 3 : The Resolution, the conflict rises to one more crisis and then is resolved.
Most of this info I grabbed from a site, as I've not written a script before, just worked, chatted with and interviewed writers who have.
I remembered most of this but it was easier to look it up.
So I'd say we might need to take a step back here, the first step of writing a script is to know the process.
Of which you need to know you need to have a treatment first!
Maybe research should actually be the first step.
:)

For my own inspiration, I normally listen to music to get me in the mood.
It acts as a good source of ideas and also the tone informs me on how I want the script to make the audience feel.
I also outline everything I write: using a step-outline which is a point by plot outline that covers all the scenes from Act One to Act Three.
Sometimes, I use index cards to map out each scene, but now I’m trying to do that more and be able to write treatments as well.
I take lots of notes as well.
Here’s a video from the Oscars where filmmaker Ava DuVernay discusses her process and it’s a little similar to how I work .
With each script I write, I try to read fiction from the particular genre to get a feel of what worked before and see what works for me while also seeing where I can bend the rules a little bit.
And I also research any relevant topic in the story to make it authentic.
For advice, I would simply suggest reading books by screenwriting teachers on the subject.
And also there’s plenty of resources online that could help.
To begin off, Aristotle’s Poetics would be a good place to start since screenwriting is greatly influenced by his guidelines for a good narrative.
I would also advise reading these books in particular:
Screenwriting websites (online resources I would suggest) include:
The next step would be to put the story down, either type it out or write it down on paper.
When you actually physically put the story down is when you'll start seeing things more clearly.
The following are points you must keep in mind while putting down your story:
– to think of the story with your "eyes" and not with your "literacy".

– always remember to answer "what for" and this is not the subtext of the film.

– your story can not be a series of events – it involves a theme and plot.

– your story must have background and context answering all questions that may be asked during its reading
– keep your story-line simple so you can add layers to it later.

– make sure you've done your research before you put down your story.
You must remember what you put on paper now might not necessarily be how your movie script or your final film looks like.
Things change at every stage of writing and reviewing.
After you put down your story, you move on to write your movie script.
Your movie script is when you flesh out aspects of your story and set a timeline (the way you tell your story is made definite).
You may or may not use dialogues at this stage.
You must also remember to keep in mind that the script must be shoot-able and still simple.
In your movie script you answer two basic questions:
– What is the film about?
– What is the overall feel of the film?
You must keep these in mind while scripting your film.
While scripting, you make another important decision – Who's point-of-view is the story being narrated from? You must keep this in mind while scripting your film entirely.
In one line, a script ties up aspects of the story by fleshing it out.

The best advice I can give is to know your own writing process.
If you’ve never written ANYthing before, a speech, paper, or short story or article, know how you work and then find that groove in order to complete a script.
It helps to outline a cohesive story first and be as specific as you can.
Outline a scene and then try to write THAT scene.
Sometimes one scene can make you tell whether or not its an Idea you want to actually explore or leave.
Be sure to SAVE all your drafts and changes and all ideas so that you can see your evolution process and you can learn more.
It really is helpful I’ve found.
And finally, be prepared to edit A LOT.
Throw out lines and scenes that don’t work even though they may be the best thing you’ve ever written.
Save it and use it for something else later.
Be prepared for a lot of criticism and if your script gets made, be prepared for it to be re-written and changed A LOT even if you’re a part of the process.
Sometimes changes are a part of the collaborative experience and just plain necessary given restraints and story.
Find an Idea you’re committed to and passionate about, and then just write it.
Story is important, but find or tell a story YOU really want to get put out there and people to know and enjoy.
If you’re attached to a story or idea, you’re less likely to just leave it unfinished and move on.
My first script I wrote in high-school using Microsoft word and all it consisted of was some descriptions of scenes and shots and then all the dialogue for the characters.
Once I became comfortable with my own style of writing scripts I began to learn the “proper” way to do it and transferred my script to a formal (screenplay/script) form.
Guides for this can be found online, and definitions for the proper word and terms usages.
Also free templates can be found on some sites, that will help you do it for you.
And some sites give you writing tools and the template for a small one time fee if that’s what you’re interested in.
I do not recommend buying a script writing software as it just doesn’t seem cost effective to me.
If you sell a script or get something made and are cranking out scripts left and right, maybe then would be a good time to invest in that.
Hope this works!

After tons and tons of work.
It's next to impossible to begin writing the actual script before working out the plot, theme, what you want to say, who your characters are – not to mention researching.
This is due to the fact that screenplay pages are meant to be a film in a written form, and while in novels and prose in general, meandering and deepening the subject matter works, in films, everything has to be in constant movement – film is storytelling with movement, whether it's actual movement of characters, camera etc.
or “apparent” movement of cuts.
You can't keep things moving (or moving in the right direction) if your mind blanks out about important facets of your story.
Work them out as best as you can.
Jot down those exquisite lines, descriptions, and actions in a notebook, where they'll be waiting while you work out your story by outlining, mind mapping, and doing whatever else feels appropriate.
Good luck and perseverance!

Well, to begin with you should do some brainstorming before you actually begin to write something.
Remember it’s your first time, so be cautious enough to make your stuff entertaining enough and avoid unintended cliche.
The idea of getting recurring success based on some fixed ideology or concept can only work for some seasoned film maker.
So just make it a point that you stick to originality.
This does not mean you cannot use something that has influenced you for the lifetime.
The first and most important thing is to decide the character map.
Select a central character around which the whole story will be woven.
It’s easier to imagine and write screenplays that way, so there are no loose ends to the whole thing.
Writing a screenplay involving multiple central characters will turn up into a mess at some stage, so as a novice you should avoid it.
Now a key point to remember here is that you have to first decide the flow of the characters along the film and then create the scenes.
Once you’ve done with creation of scenes, it’s now time to add a complete personality to your characters.
I would recommend to always keep the personality to character mapping at last, as it gives you good creative freedom.
Write down all the nuances of all the characters in your script.
Always take a look at this data, before writing scenes and dialogues between your characters.
Finally compile all your scenes together to form a great screenplay.
No matter how good screenplay you write, the director is bound to make changes according to his comfort when he will direct the stuff.
So keep some fluidity while writing the scenes unless you are writing for a genre like thriller, crime drama, etc.
Finally if you are a novice and you have got very experience in writing, then always try to write some lightweight genre like romance or family drama.
As a novice, one shouldn’t try hand at crime dramas, sport dramas and never even think of writing comedies.
Once you’ve tried your luck 2–3 times, you can try experimenting with different genres.

If you don’t know how to write a movie script, then my advice to you, first and foremost, is to take a screenwriting class.
If you are not in Los Angeles or New York, that should not be a problem.
There are many online courses available.
I believe Gotham Writers Workshop has them available.
There are also loads of screenwriting classes available online through places like Teachable.
Just do a search for online screenwriting.
If you are in Los Angeles, you can take a Community College course or take a class through UCLA Extension.
What’s great about UCLA Extension is that you have actual screenwriters with solid credits teaching the courses.
If you do take a course, I would suggest taking one that teaches you how to write the first 10 pages or the first act of your screenplay.
Do not worry about learning the whole process in one course.
While there are courses that offer that option, I can tell you from experience and film development knowledge that the first 10 pages are the most important in your screenplay.
I worked as a Development Executive as well as a Reader.
There is a well-known rule in Hollywood: If the first 10 pages suck, then don’t bother with the rest of the script.
That harsh reality means that if I am not intrigued by the first 10 pages, your script will end up in the trash, either on my computer or in a recycling bin.
Now, before you feel that I am being mean, I can tell you that after reading hundreds of scripts, you want to pull your hair out if the writing is bad.
After thousands, you want to throw the script into a fire.
I realize that sounds harsh but Hollywood is harsh.
It is far better to know how people are going in than expecting to be welcomed with love, unicorns and butterflies that have banners exclaiming you are a great writer.
That does not even happen when you win an Oscar.
Another harsh truth is that your first few screenplays might not be perfect.
They might suck, but that is okay.
That is you learning how to write.
There is a story I used to hear in a TV writing course where a well-known show runner said that no script was good until it was on top of the pile of scripts on your floor that essentially reached your mid-calf.
He said that was the script he would read and it would most likely be the best-written one.
That means most likely script number seven, eight, nine or ten.
Therefore, learning the craft of screenwriting is essential.
Reading books helps a lot but nothing replaces going into a class or taking a class and truly learning about the process.
Hal Ackerman is a great screenwriting teacher.
I took two courses from him while I was at UCLA and one of the courses was simply watching the first ten minutes of films he felt were great for establishing character.
Then we would write an essay on those first ten minutes and finally, write our first ten pages of the screenplay.
I learned more in that course than I learned in many of my undergrad classes.
The second writing course I would recommend is learning how to write a proper first act of your screenplay.
Yes, that is it.
Three months on 30 pages; but guess what? You should have a solid 30 pages.
I can’t impress upon you how important having a strong opening and first act are.
It can make or break your screenplay.
The reason for this is that if the reader or executive or assistant has just invested at least 30 minutes of his or her life, then he or she believes this script has potential.
That is the only way your entire script will be read.
The other important thing is to buy some screenplays of movies that you like.
Read them like you are reading a book.
See the difference between screenwriting and novel writing.
The main difference is the format and the fact that screenwriting is sparse.
You need to pack everything, emotions, dialogue and action into one to three pages of a scene.
In a novel, you can take five or ten pages to write the same thing.
Learning to be a good storyteller with very little language is an art form.
Another thing you should know is that if you do not properly format your screenplay, it won’t get read.
A nice person might let you know you need to format it correctly.
Most people will just toss it.
This is why a beginning screenwriting class is so good.
You will spend quite a while learning how to format things.
It is not a waste of time, it is essential to being a good screenwriter.
Before anyone feels too put upon to learn the formatting, think about this: when I first took a screenwriting course in the early 1990s, I had to type all my scenes on my IBM Selectric typewriter.
I actually had to learn how to set tabs on it.
You also need screenwriting software.
As Madeleine said below, get Final Draft.
Now, I have a definite ambivalence to Final Draft.
I think it is clunky and not as intuitive as it could be.
I also think their key code method is ridiculous.
If you change computers, you have to change the key code.
If you want to write on two different computers, it costs you more money.
They are also very expensive.
However, they tend to be the industry standard.
That said, a lot of my writer friends use other scriptwriting software.
It just depends.
If you take a course, you should find out which one you need before you invest.
I think the free software is a waste of your time.
It never does what you need it to do.
Finally, I would look at some old editions of Written By, the WGAWest magazine.
There are a lot of great interviews.
You can learn a lot about screenwriting by listening to writers talk about their craft.
One last thing, when you are done writing, always register your script with the Writer’s Guild.
You can do it online.
You can also copyright it as well.
Good luck!

Updated: 27.06.2019 — 7:04 pm

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