How do I write a fantasy novel without good and evil clich

How do I write a fantasy novel without good and evil cliché?

You have to have conflict.
You could (theoretically) write a comedy of manners or a romance set in a fantasy world (stranger things have been successful) but conflict and conflict on a large scale is what fans of the genre like.
That said there don’t have to be clear ‘goodies and baddies’.
There can be groups, be they religions, street gangs or nations who oppose each other and see their own actions as entirely justified even as the opposition regard them as monsters.
You just have to set it up and let the story work itself out.
Find a viewpoint character or set of characters and build the world and the events around him.
You don’t even need to include gods! There is no need at all for any supernaturally defined virtue or sin.
People can provide all that you need.

But let me ask you this: Why in the world do you want to write when you can’t think up your own ideas? I could probably come up with 20 ways to do it?
But I quit.
It’s your novel after all.
You think of an idea.

It’s all about perspective.
Showing the perspective of both sides in your writing is the only way.
For example, one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.
You need to show the alternate viewpoints of a singular issue from both sides.
My best suggestion would be you write in third person limited with alternating points of view interspersed throughout the novel.

Good versus evil is a universal struggle, but I think the problem with many novels is when they make the bad guy evil just because – there’s no plausible motivation behind the evil.
So the last thing you want is a mustache-twirling villain bent on destroying the world “just because he can.

Come up with a plausible backstory for the villain, and you’re in the clear.
Remember that no one is wholly good or wholly evil – people are complex.
And complex characters make for excellent stories.

How do I write a fantasy novel without good and evil cliché?

You have to have conflict.
You could (theoretically) write a comedy of manners or a romance set in a fantasy world (stranger things have been successful) but conflict and conflict on a large scale is what fans of the genre like.
That said there don’t have to be clear ‘goodies and baddies’.
There can be groups, be they religions, street gangs or nations who oppose each other and see their own actions as entirely justified even as the opposition regard them as monsters.
You just have to set it up and let the story work itself out.
Find a viewpoint character or set of characters and build the world and the events around him.
You don’t even need to include gods! There is no need at all for any supernaturally defined virtue or sin.
People can provide all that you need.

But let me ask you this: Why in the world do you want to write when you can’t think up your own ideas? I could probably come up with 20 ways to do it?
But I quit.
It’s your novel after all.
You think of an idea.

It’s all about perspective.
Showing the perspective of both sides in your writing is the only way.
For example, one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.
You need to show the alternate viewpoints of a singular issue from both sides.
My best suggestion would be you write in third person limited with alternating points of view interspersed throughout the novel.

Good versus evil is a universal struggle, but I think the problem with many novels is when they make the bad guy evil just because – there’s no plausible motivation behind the evil.
So the last thing you want is a mustache-twirling villain bent on destroying the world “just because he can.

Come up with a plausible backstory for the villain, and you’re in the clear.
Remember that no one is wholly good or wholly evil – people are complex.
And complex characters make for excellent stories.

Updated: 27.06.2019 — 3:38 pm

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