How do I talk like a native English speaker

How do I talk like a native English speaker?

I think you'll always have an accent, but honestly, as a native English speaker, I think foreign accents are really cool! But if they are too strong they can be hard to understand… But don't think that, that makes your English is bad.
I'm an American and I can hardly understand the Cockney accent from England, and England is where the English language was created! You could try to learn some English slang words to make your English sound more like a native English speaker.
People can also tell you aren't a native English speaker if you speak too properly, also.
For example, if you never use contractions like: it’s (it is), I’m (I am), don’t (do not), won’t (will not), etc.
people will definitely be able to tell you don't speak English natively.
Not using contractions at times can make you sound kind of awkward while you’re speaking as well.
“You’re right!” sounds a lot more natural than “You are right!” or “I’m here!” sounds better than “I am here!” you get the idea.
You really should look up the slang words for the kind of English you want to speak if you want to sound more like an English speaker, every native English speaker knows the English slang for the country they grew up in.
For example, in America, we say stuff like:
• I wanna… (I want to)
• I gotta… (I have to.
This one makes the less sense to me since it's not exactly proper English to say “I got to…” unless you’re saying something like “I got to meet my favorite band!” But saying “I gotta meet my favorite band!” only makes sense if you’re saying you want to meet them.
I know, it's weird.
.
don't ask me why it's this way, I only speak the language, I don't make the rules for it)
• Creep (you'd use this word if someone was watching you undress from your window or something, someone is a “creep” when they do unpleasant and weird things)
• Cram (like you “cram for a test” thats the only really context you use the word “cram” for.
It means you are pretty much “cramming” information into your head, studying information nonstop without taking any breaks)
• Buck (we have another use for the word “buck” in America, thats the word for a male deer, but that's another way we say “dollar”.
For example, instead of saying you have 20 dollars, you can say “I have 20 bucks”)
It’s as easy as an internet search to know the slang words for the English you want to learn.
If you’re feeling really ambitious, you could even learn all the English slang words from each English speaking country if you really wanted!
Good luck! 😀

Think in English! By thinking in English first, you don’t have to translate in your head, and this strategy can improve fluency.
Also, when speaking English in your head, this helps you internalise the language.
It means all you need is to speak without paying attention to the rules and pronunciations.
Native people speak fluently and correctly by default because they have internalised the language.
By thinking without translating, you will also speak English in a less-pressurised and more confident way.
You don’t have to worry about whether you are pronouncing correctly or being understood by others.
Another benefit of thinking in English is that it saves you time with relearning words and increases your vocabulary words that you will use in everyday conversations.
You can learn to think in English by:
1.
Start small, then go bigger
You don’t have to start with ‘complete sentence level of English’.
Instead, start smaller.
Start at individual word level.
For example, when you wake up in the morning, think of words like: bed, water, bathroom, toothbrush, breakfast, clothes, shoes.
Just think of the single English words for everything you see, hear and do.
From there, start thinking in short English sentences, then longer simple sentences.
When you become better at English, you have a wider vocabulary and you will be able to use more complex-structure sentences to express your thought and emotion.
2.
Think in English most of the time
Read and write in English.
Listen to English.
Communicate in English.
Convert everything that uses languages in your life to English, for example, your phone default language, etc.
Even when you take notes, do it in English.
Just use it in all the occasions you can get.
Living in an English-speaking country like Australia and You may naturally gravitate towards an accent (usually Standard American), but know that it is OK to speak with a combination of accents.

Thank you for asking an interesting question.
There are many ways to develop the ability of talking English fluently.
You can apply following rules to develop English Speaking
Don’t study grammar too much
However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.
Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you.
You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native.
Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules.
Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence.
When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together.
Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.
Read News Paper
Reading news paper will develop the ability of talking English fluently.
[1]
By applying following principled you can develop English Speaking.

How can I start speaking English like a native speaker?
In my opinion, there is no shortcut.
You must engage in two-way conversation with native English speakers, just as young children do.
See these similar Quora questions for more opinions on this subject:

Well, first you have to decide what you want to sound like.
There are lots of native speakers of English, and many sound nothing alike.
I’m presuming you want to sound either like an American or an Englishman, and not, say, a Native of the Indian subcontinent, a Jamaican, or a New Zealander.
(The US and the UK have tons of dialects with their borders, but we’ll say either the Queen’s English, or the US Midwestern “newscaster” dialect).
Then, you have to become completely fluent in the language.
This is the hardest part.
It really requires that you go to live in the country the accent of which you wish to adopt.
If that isn’t possible, find the biggest gathering of English speakers in your area, and spend as much time with them as possible.
Once you are fluent, it is time to begin learning to sound like a native.
If you can afford it, it would be nice if you could make an appointment with a speech therapist who speaks the dialect you want to speak.
That would be very helpful.
People have accents because they pronounce not exactly each sound of their new language, but the closest approximation in their native language.
A speech therapist will approach this like a pathology (it isn’t, I’m just saying, this is the approach if you want to sound exactly like a native).
The therapist will help you with tongue and lip placement so that you can learn the precise sounds of your desired accent.
Meanwhile, keep studying English, and pay special attention to the use of prepositions.
Prepositions are very tricky words, and can trip up even people who have lived in the US a long time.
Also, pay attention to the way people move when they are talking casually.
Learn the body language that goes with your new accent, and learn the rhythms that go with casual speech.
Study up on popular culture, so you understand the references.
For example, in the US, if something is creepy or eerie, people often do not explicitly say so, but rather hum the theme song to an old TV show called The Twilight Zone, which had eerie or uncanny stories.
You need to know things like that to be completely fluent in the vernacular form of the language.
It is a big undertaking, but it is possible.
My father studied Russian for many years beginning when he was 18, and in his fifties, while on a trip to Moscow, got into some minor trouble with the police (this was still Soviet Russia) who did not believe my father was an American, They thought he was a Russian trying to sneak into one of the hard currency stores off limits to Russians— foreigners with foreign currency only were allowed.
They were going to confiscate the American money he had with him, because they thought he must have stolen it, but he convinced them to follow him back to his hotel so he could show them his passport, which for some reason he didn’t have on him in the first place.
Anyway, good luck to you.

Adults can achieve high levels of fluency as a combination of their motivation, hard work, the L1-L2 distance and their language aptitude.
You can practice your speaking with native speakers at critical period) it becomes very difficult to sound like a native in a second language (L2).
The presence of the first language (L1) is the "inescapable difference in L2 learning" (Cook, 2008).
A search for "accent reduction courses" on Amazon yields interesting results, which you may want to check out: Questions around language learning end up in a series of I-can-do-it-and-so-can-you

Pronunciation is usually the biggest hurdle to sounding like a native speaker in a language.
It helps if you have a good ear and can hear the different sounds.
It also helps if you study the place and manner of elocution (how the mouth is shaped to produce each particular sound).
After that, one of the most efficient ways to improve your pronunciation is by recording your voice.
There are many techniques you can use, but one of the most useful is to take a native speaker recording and listen to it phrase by phrase, recording your own voice saying the same phrase immediately afterwards.
Keep on doing this until you feel that you are mimicking the pronunciation and intonation perfectly.
Most people don’t like hearing the sound of their recorded voice.
“Do I really sound like that?” The bad news is, yes, you do.
The good news is that you can change it.
Actors listen to their voice to recognize and change things like nasality, to get the voice coming from lower down, instead of from the chest, to pace their speech and pause effectively.
Things like this can be changed by recording one’s voice more freely.
For example, you can watch a video with the volume down and record your description of what’s happening on the screen.
Recording is like a mirror for your voice.
Most people don’t like looking at their face in the mirror first thing in the morning, but they do it anyway, because it is the best way to check for anything that might be wrong – wrinkles, sleep in the eyes, etc.
In the same way, we generally don’t like listening to our own voice, but if we do it anyway we quickly realize it is one of the most efficient ways to catch our mistakes and eliminate them.

This is what you can do in order to improve your language skills (especially if English is not your native language):
Actually, broadening/improving one's language skills is a very broad concept, it should be done in more than one ways at the same time which is highly recommended.
One can NOT become better ONLY in one area, say, speaking, one MUST improve skills in ALL dimensions of the language!
Learning language well requires being as active as possible and making the learning as FUN for oneself as possible.
Taking lessons is always important, but equally important are these:
1) Listen/watch: Keep listening to internet radio stations like BBC, watch TV shows in English (use only subtitles, NOT voice dubbing in case you are not a native English speaker!), etc.
2) Write/communicate: Try to find discussion forums from the web about things that you find interesting and FUN (music/various artists, hobbies, etc.
) and start communicating there with other people using only English.
Start using instant messaging systems in case you find some new friends or start emailing them.
Please do NOT be afraid of making mistakes or hesitating, because even native speakers do make mistakes and do hesitate at times! The more you enjoy communicating, the better!
3) Buy yourself a proper dictionary, and each time when you see a strange word that you do not understand, look it up.
Putting words into their CONTEXT is one of the best ways to broaden one's vocabulary and grammar knowledge, the more you read and write the better.
Memorizing is not the best way to go with learning vocabulary, grammar or any other language areas! For idioms, you should buy an all-English dictionary which explains the words in English and shows you examples of how to use the words in their REAL context.
The main point in ANY language learning is to make it as fun as possible for yourself.
Try to find topics that INTEREST you, read online newspapers (Times, Guardian, Independent.
.
.
), listen to BBC/NBC and other radio stations online, if you find a discussion forum for e.
g.
your favourite hobby or your idols in music do participate there, etc.
The key word here is CONTEXT, which means that it is easier to learn new words and their usage as well as grammar when you use/see them in their real CONTEXT.
The more you see and hear the new words in their context and the more you use them in your speech & writing, the easier it becomes to remember their meanings and correct spelling.
Do NOT be afraid of making mistakes though, because even native speakers do make mistakes and do hesitate at times!
I'm sorry there is NO EASY WAY out with this, one really must develop language skills in ALL these language "levels" or dimensions in order to reach better language skills!!
Last but not least: NEVER EVER use ANY online translators, they are nothing but utter rubbish!! English is practically EVERYWHERE in the online world these days, you just have to use your imagination to find it! Learning pace is always personal, it takes the time it takes so there is no reason to hurry it up too much.
If you do, you will not learn so well.
Also, please learn the basics of the standard English first before advancing to finer details like dialects/accents.
A word of warning though: Do stay well away from overrated, overpriced and overhyped language "gimmicks" such as Rosetta Stone, they really are NOT worth for checking out! Also, never mind about your accent, as the main goal for you is that others understand you and you being able to understand other speakers.

For second language learners, the question should seldom be “How can I talk like a native?” but rather “How can I speak enough like a native to be understood?” With the exception of pre-teen learners and a few gifted polyglots, native speech is not attainable, nor should it be the goal.
If you speak like a native but don’t have full cultural competence, you will be mistaken for a native who is rude or otherwise doesn’t behave by The Rules, that is, cultural norms.
A hint of foreign accent gives your (native) listeners the signal that you’re “not from here” and therefore incur less rigorous judgment in business or social interactions.
If you are serious about ramping up your pronunciation accuracy, self-help (listening/mimicking) will get you only so far.
At some point you’ll need to hire a professional coach who has the training and methodologies to modify those portions of your accent that give native speakers trouble in understanding you.

To acquire the accent of a native speaker is a rigorous process.
It is possible but even then you might find your accent to be a bit different from a native speaker.
If you observe, in most of the movies, the accent of the characters depends on where they come from.
An Indian will always have a hint of the innate ‘Indianness’ in his accent.
Moreover, you should not be trying to imitate the accent of a native speaker as there is no harm to have a slight influence of your regional accent in your speech.
However, if you are set on acquiring the native speaker’s accent, concentrate on the listening and speaking areas of the language (note: a language has four key areas – speaking, listening, reading and writing).
Try to listen to as much audio as you can get hands on.
English movies and videos on YouTube are a good way to go.
Try practicing everyday by repeating what you hear.
You can record your own voice to check and improve by yourself.
Listening and speaking practice is necessary, dedicating at least an hour a day.
This will slowly help you emulate the accent of a native English speaker.
On a different note, for improving your vocabulary, do check out the VoLT app.
It has a good collection of English words with techniques to remember them such as usage in a sentence, mnemonics, pictorial representation, etc:
Oliver Teacher

#Questiion name: How do I talk like a native English speaker? EL222235666
TOP 6 TIPS TO LEARN ENGLISH
#1.
Accept That English Is a Weird Language
Sometimes you can find patterns in English grammar, but other times English doesn’t make sense at all.
For example, why are read (reed) and read (red) the same word, but pronounced differently depending on whether you’re speaking in the past or present tense? Or why is “mice” the plural of “mouse”, but “houses” is the plural of “house”?
Unfortunately, there are just as many exceptions as there are rules in English.
It’s easy to get stuck on learning how to speak English properly, if you try to find a reason for everything.
Sometimes English is weird and unexplainable, so instead the best thing to do is just memorize the strange exceptions and move on.
Related post top 7 frree and paiid English speaking courrses: You may naturally gravitate towards an accent (usually Standard American), but know that it is OK to speak with a combination of accents.

Thank you for asking an interesting question.
There are many ways to develop the ability of talking English fluently.
You can apply following rules to develop English Speaking
Don’t study grammar too much
However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.
Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you.
You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native.
Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules.
Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence.
When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together.
Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.
Read News Paper
Reading news paper will develop the ability of talking English fluently.
[1]
By applying following principled you can develop English Speaking.

How can I start speaking English like a native speaker?
In my opinion, there is no shortcut.
You must engage in two-way conversation with native English speakers, just as young children do.
See these similar Quora questions for more opinions on this subject:

Well, first you have to decide what you want to sound like.
There are lots of native speakers of English, and many sound nothing alike.
I’m presuming you want to sound either like an American or an Englishman, and not, say, a Native of the Indian subcontinent, a Jamaican, or a New Zealander.
(The US and the UK have tons of dialects with their borders, but we’ll say either the Queen’s English, or the US Midwestern “newscaster” dialect).
Then, you have to become completely fluent in the language.
This is the hardest part.
It really requires that you go to live in the country the accent of which you wish to adopt.
If that isn’t possible, find the biggest gathering of English speakers in your area, and spend as much time with them as possible.
Once you are fluent, it is time to begin learning to sound like a native.
If you can afford it, it would be nice if you could make an appointment with a speech therapist who speaks the dialect you want to speak.
That would be very helpful.
People have accents because they pronounce not exactly each sound of their new language, but the closest approximation in their native language.
A speech therapist will approach this like a pathology (it isn’t, I’m just saying, this is the approach if you want to sound exactly like a native).
The therapist will help you with tongue and lip placement so that you can learn the precise sounds of your desired accent.
Meanwhile, keep studying English, and pay special attention to the use of prepositions.
Prepositions are very tricky words, and can trip up even people who have lived in the US a long time.
Also, pay attention to the way people move when they are talking casually.
Learn the body language that goes with your new accent, and learn the rhythms that go with casual speech.
Study up on popular culture, so you understand the references.
For example, in the US, if something is creepy or eerie, people often do not explicitly say so, but rather hum the theme song to an old TV show called The Twilight Zone, which had eerie or uncanny stories.
You need to know things like that to be completely fluent in the vernacular form of the language.
It is a big undertaking, but it is possible.
My father studied Russian for many years beginning when he was 18, and in his fifties, while on a trip to Moscow, got into some minor trouble with the police (this was still Soviet Russia) who did not believe my father was an American, They thought he was a Russian trying to sneak into one of the hard currency stores off limits to Russians— foreigners with foreign currency only were allowed.
They were going to confiscate the American money he had with him, because they thought he must have stolen it, but he convinced them to follow him back to his hotel so he could show them his passport, which for some reason he didn’t have on him in the first place.
Anyway, good luck to you.

Adults can achieve high levels of fluency as a combination of their motivation, hard work, the L1-L2 distance and their language aptitude.
You can practice your speaking with native speakers at critical period) it becomes very difficult to sound like a native in a second language (L2).
The presence of the first language (L1) is the "inescapable difference in L2 learning" (Cook, 2008).
A search for "accent reduction courses" on Amazon yields interesting results, which you may want to check out: Questions around language learning end up in a series of I-can-do-it-and-so-can-you

Pronunciation is usually the biggest hurdle to sounding like a native speaker in a language.
It helps if you have a good ear and can hear the different sounds.
It also helps if you study the place and manner of elocution (how the mouth is shaped to produce each particular sound).
After that, one of the most efficient ways to improve your pronunciation is by recording your voice.
There are many techniques you can use, but one of the most useful is to take a native speaker recording and listen to it phrase by phrase, recording your own voice saying the same phrase immediately afterwards.
Keep on doing this until you feel that you are mimicking the pronunciation and intonation perfectly.
Most people don’t like hearing the sound of their recorded voice.
“Do I really sound like that?” The bad news is, yes, you do.
The good news is that you can change it.
Actors listen to their voice to recognize and change things like nasality, to get the voice coming from lower down, instead of from the chest, to pace their speech and pause effectively.
Things like this can be changed by recording one’s voice more freely.
For example, you can watch a video with the volume down and record your description of what’s happening on the screen.
Recording is like a mirror for your voice.
Most people don’t like looking at their face in the mirror first thing in the morning, but they do it anyway, because it is the best way to check for anything that might be wrong – wrinkles, sleep in the eyes, etc.
In the same way, we generally don’t like listening to our own voice, but if we do it anyway we quickly realize it is one of the most efficient ways to catch our mistakes and eliminate them.

This is what you can do in order to improve your language skills (especially if English is not your native language):
Actually, broadening/improving one's language skills is a very broad concept, it should be done in more than one ways at the same time which is highly recommended.
One can NOT become better ONLY in one area, say, speaking, one MUST improve skills in ALL dimensions of the language!
Learning language well requires being as active as possible and making the learning as FUN for oneself as possible.
Taking lessons is always important, but equally important are these:
1) Listen/watch: Keep listening to internet radio stations like BBC, watch TV shows in English (use only subtitles, NOT voice dubbing in case you are not a native English speaker!), etc.
2) Write/communicate: Try to find discussion forums from the web about things that you find interesting and FUN (music/various artists, hobbies, etc.
) and start communicating there with other people using only English.
Start using instant messaging systems in case you find some new friends or start emailing them.
Please do NOT be afraid of making mistakes or hesitating, because even native speakers do make mistakes and do hesitate at times! The more you enjoy communicating, the better!
3) Buy yourself a proper dictionary, and each time when you see a strange word that you do not understand, look it up.
Putting words into their CONTEXT is one of the best ways to broaden one's vocabulary and grammar knowledge, the more you read and write the better.
Memorizing is not the best way to go with learning vocabulary, grammar or any other language areas! For idioms, you should buy an all-English dictionary which explains the words in English and shows you examples of how to use the words in their REAL context.
The main point in ANY language learning is to make it as fun as possible for yourself.
Try to find topics that INTEREST you, read online newspapers (Times, Guardian, Independent.
.
.
), listen to BBC/NBC and other radio stations online, if you find a discussion forum for e.
g.
your favourite hobby or your idols in music do participate there, etc.
The key word here is CONTEXT, which means that it is easier to learn new words and their usage as well as grammar when you use/see them in their real CONTEXT.
The more you see and hear the new words in their context and the more you use them in your speech & writing, the easier it becomes to remember their meanings and correct spelling.
Do NOT be afraid of making mistakes though, because even native speakers do make mistakes and do hesitate at times!
I'm sorry there is NO EASY WAY out with this, one really must develop language skills in ALL these language "levels" or dimensions in order to reach better language skills!!
Last but not least: NEVER EVER use ANY online translators, they are nothing but utter rubbish!! English is practically EVERYWHERE in the online world these days, you just have to use your imagination to find it! Learning pace is always personal, it takes the time it takes so there is no reason to hurry it up too much.
If you do, you will not learn so well.
Also, please learn the basics of the standard English first before advancing to finer details like dialects/accents.
A word of warning though: Do stay well away from overrated, overpriced and overhyped language "gimmicks" such as Rosetta Stone, they really are NOT worth for checking out! Also, never mind about your accent, as the main goal for you is that others understand you and you being able to understand other speakers.

How do I talk like a native English speaker?

There are 2 things.
How you speak English and what type of English you use.
take a walk, build a house, change the oil, avoid an accident, by mistake, in queue, at the top, take advantage of, pay attention, etc.
You see, these type of word groups work as single units.
You can use these clusters to express your thoughts by not having to worry about putting individual words together and worrying about grammar.
They change your focus from how to what you want to say.
That said, never imitate others’ accents! You’d sound awful.
You’d sound unauthentic.
Native speakers don’t have an accent.
It’s the way they speak.
The best the foreign speakers can do is speak English in the way it should be spoken.
We as foreign speakers assume English is spoken in the same way as our mother tongue.
This makes it difficult to carry on conversation in English over longer periods of time even for people who know English quite well.
The fact is English is spoken quite differently and none of the Indian/Asian language bears any resemblance.
English has its own set of phrases, idioms, and collocations and its very own song-like way of speech.
You see, English has a certain rhythm and not all words are pronounced equally.
Some words are shortened, some words change form in Spoken English.
For ex:
1.
It is hell of a game.
spoken as: isheləvəgame (notice ‘It’s’ became ‘Is’, ‘Of’ became ‘əv’, ‘a’ became ‘ə’)
2.
The discount price is $10.
Spoken as: thədiscoumpricis$10 (notice ‘nt’ became ‘m’) 3.
I’m not used to this kind of weather.
Spoken as: əmnochoostothiskindəweather (notice ‘I’m’ became ‘əm’, ‘not used’ became ‘nochoosed’, ‘used to’ became ‘use to’, etc.
)
That brings us to:
Syllables
Every word in English has one or more syllables.
A syllable is a vowel sound in a word.
For ex: “Moon” has only 1 syllable “English” has 2 syllables viz.
Eng, lish “Syllable” has 3 syllables viz.
Sy, lla, ble “Ability” has 4 syllables viz.
A, bi, li, ty
And only one syllable is always stressed and other syllables are unstressed.
The syllable which receives stress can be in any position.
“Moon” should be always stressed as it’s the only syllable there.
“English” has 2 syllables and stress falls only on first syllable and second syllable is unstressed: pronounced like “ENGlish”
Stressed syllable gets longer time and unstressed syllables are rushed over.
For ex, in “Impressive”, the stress falls on second syllable and it’s pronounced as “imPRESSive”.
You should spend more time on “PRESS” and stress it and just glide over “im” and “ive” and shouldn’t stress them.
“Schwa”
In unstressed syllables, vowels often get reduced to a semi-vowel sound called ‘Schwa’.
It’s written as inverted ‘e’ (“ə”).
It’s the the sound between ‘s’ and ‘p’ in ‘supply’.
the sound between ‘p’ and ’n’ in ‘company’.
So in connected speech, “am” gets reduced to “əm”, “and” to “ən”, “was” to “wəs”, etc.
These and other things are clearly explained in
You may naturally gravitate towards an accent (usually Standard American), but know that it is OK to speak with a combination of accents.

Thank you for asking an interesting question.
There are many ways to develop the ability of talking English fluently.
You can apply following rules to develop English Speaking
Don’t study grammar too much
However, if you want to become fluent in English, then you should try to learn English without studying the grammar.
Studying grammar will only slow you down and confuse you.
You will think about the rules when creating sentences instead of naturally saying a sentence like a native.
Remember that only a small fraction of English speakers know more than 20% of all the grammar rules.
Learn and study phrases
Many students learn vocabulary and try to put many words together to create a proper sentence.
When children learn a language, they learn both words and phrases together.
Likewise, you need to study and learn phrases.
Read News Paper
Reading news paper will develop the ability of talking English fluently.
[1]
By applying following principled you can develop English Speaking.

How can I start speaking English like a native speaker?
In my opinion, there is no shortcut.
You must engage in two-way conversation with native English speakers, just as young children do.
See these similar Quora questions for more opinions on this subject:

Well, first you have to decide what you want to sound like.
There are lots of native speakers of English, and many sound nothing alike.
I’m presuming you want to sound either like an American or an Englishman, and not, say, a Native of the Indian subcontinent, a Jamaican, or a New Zealander.
(The US and the UK have tons of dialects with their borders, but we’ll say either the Queen’s English, or the US Midwestern “newscaster” dialect).
Then, you have to become completely fluent in the language.
This is the hardest part.
It really requires that you go to live in the country the accent of which you wish to adopt.
If that isn’t possible, find the biggest gathering of English speakers in your area, and spend as much time with them as possible.
Once you are fluent, it is time to begin learning to sound like a native.
If you can afford it, it would be nice if you could make an appointment with a speech therapist who speaks the dialect you want to speak.
That would be very helpful.
People have accents because they pronounce not exactly each sound of their new language, but the closest approximation in their native language.
A speech therapist will approach this like a pathology (it isn’t, I’m just saying, this is the approach if you want to sound exactly like a native).
The therapist will help you with tongue and lip placement so that you can learn the precise sounds of your desired accent.
Meanwhile, keep studying English, and pay special attention to the use of prepositions.
Prepositions are very tricky words, and can trip up even people who have lived in the US a long time.
Also, pay attention to the way people move when they are talking casually.
Learn the body language that goes with your new accent, and learn the rhythms that go with casual speech.
Study up on popular culture, so you understand the references.
For example, in the US, if something is creepy or eerie, people often do not explicitly say so, but rather hum the theme song to an old TV show called The Twilight Zone, which had eerie or uncanny stories.
You need to know things like that to be completely fluent in the vernacular form of the language.
It is a big undertaking, but it is possible.
My father studied Russian for many years beginning when he was 18, and in his fifties, while on a trip to Moscow, got into some minor trouble with the police (this was still Soviet Russia) who did not believe my father was an American, They thought he was a Russian trying to sneak into one of the hard currency stores off limits to Russians— foreigners with foreign currency only were allowed.
They were going to confiscate the American money he had with him, because they thought he must have stolen it, but he convinced them to follow him back to his hotel so he could show them his passport, which for some reason he didn’t have on him in the first place.
Anyway, good luck to you.

Adults can achieve high levels of fluency as a combination of their motivation, hard work, the L1-L2 distance and their language aptitude.
You can practice your speaking with native speakers at critical period) it becomes very difficult to sound like a native in a second language (L2).
The presence of the first language (L1) is the "inescapable difference in L2 learning" (Cook, 2008).
A search for "accent reduction courses" on Amazon yields interesting results, which you may want to check out: Questions around language learning end up in a series of I-can-do-it-and-so-can-you

Pronunciation is usually the biggest hurdle to sounding like a native speaker in a language.
It helps if you have a good ear and can hear the different sounds.
It also helps if you study the place and manner of elocution (how the mouth is shaped to produce each particular sound).
After that, one of the most efficient ways to improve your pronunciation is by recording your voice.
There are many techniques you can use, but one of the most useful is to take a native speaker recording and listen to it phrase by phrase, recording your own voice saying the same phrase immediately afterwards.
Keep on doing this until you feel that you are mimicking the pronunciation and intonation perfectly.
Most people don’t like hearing the sound of their recorded voice.
“Do I really sound like that?” The bad news is, yes, you do.
The good news is that you can change it.
Actors listen to their voice to recognize and change things like nasality, to get the voice coming from lower down, instead of from the chest, to pace their speech and pause effectively.
Things like this can be changed by recording one’s voice more freely.
For example, you can watch a video with the volume down and record your description of what’s happening on the screen.
Recording is like a mirror for your voice.
Most people don’t like looking at their face in the mirror first thing in the morning, but they do it anyway, because it is the best way to check for anything that might be wrong – wrinkles, sleep in the eyes, etc.
In the same way, we generally don’t like listening to our own voice, but if we do it anyway we quickly realize it is one of the most efficient ways to catch our mistakes and eliminate them.

This is what you can do in order to improve your language skills (especially if English is not your native language):
Actually, broadening/improving one's language skills is a very broad concept, it should be done in more than one ways at the same time which is highly recommended.
One can NOT become better ONLY in one area, say, speaking, one MUST improve skills in ALL dimensions of the language!
Learning language well requires being as active as possible and making the learning as FUN for oneself as possible.
Taking lessons is always important, but equally important are these:
1) Listen/watch: Keep listening to internet radio stations like BBC, watch TV shows in English (use only subtitles, NOT voice dubbing in case you are not a native English speaker!), etc.
2) Write/communicate: Try to find discussion forums from the web about things that you find interesting and FUN (music/various artists, hobbies, etc.
) and start communicating there with other people using only English.
Start using instant messaging systems in case you find some new friends or start emailing them.
Please do NOT be afraid of making mistakes or hesitating, because even native speakers do make mistakes and do hesitate at times! The more you enjoy communicating, the better!
3) Buy yourself a proper dictionary, and each time when you see a strange word that you do not understand, look it up.
Putting words into their CONTEXT is one of the best ways to broaden one's vocabulary and grammar knowledge, the more you read and write the better.
Memorizing is not the best way to go with learning vocabulary, grammar or any other language areas! For idioms, you should buy an all-English dictionary which explains the words in English and shows you examples of how to use the words in their REAL context.
The main point in ANY language learning is to make it as fun as possible for yourself.
Try to find topics that INTEREST you, read online newspapers (Times, Guardian, Independent.
.
.
), listen to BBC/NBC and other radio stations online, if you find a discussion forum for e.
g.
your favourite hobby or your idols in music do participate there, etc.
The key word here is CONTEXT, which means that it is easier to learn new words and their usage as well as grammar when you use/see them in their real CONTEXT.
The more you see and hear the new words in their context and the more you use them in your speech & writing, the easier it becomes to remember their meanings and correct spelling.
Do NOT be afraid of making mistakes though, because even native speakers do make mistakes and do hesitate at times!
I'm sorry there is NO EASY WAY out with this, one really must develop language skills in ALL these language "levels" or dimensions in order to reach better language skills!!
Last but not least: NEVER EVER use ANY online translators, they are nothing but utter rubbish!! English is practically EVERYWHERE in the online world these days, you just have to use your imagination to find it! Learning pace is always personal, it takes the time it takes so there is no reason to hurry it up too much.
If you do, you will not learn so well.
Also, please learn the basics of the standard English first before advancing to finer details like dialects/accents.
A word of warning though: Do stay well away from overrated, overpriced and overhyped language "gimmicks" such as Rosetta Stone, they really are NOT worth for checking out! Also, never mind about your accent, as the main goal for you is that others understand you and you being able to understand other speakers.

For second language learners, the question should seldom be “How can I talk like a native?” but rather “How can I speak enough like a native to be understood?” With the exception of pre-teen learners and a few gifted polyglots, native speech is not attainable, nor should it be the goal.
If you speak like a native but don’t have full cultural competence, you will be mistaken for a native who is rude or otherwise doesn’t behave by The Rules, that is, cultural norms.
A hint of foreign accent gives your (native) listeners the signal that you’re “not from here” and therefore incur less rigorous judgment in business or social interactions.
If you are serious about ramping up your pronunciation accuracy, self-help (listening/mimicking) will get you only so far.
At some point you’ll need to hire a professional coach who has the training and methodologies to modify those portions of your accent that give native speakers trouble in understanding you.

To acquire the accent of a native speaker is a rigorous process.
It is possible but even then you might find your accent to be a bit different from a native speaker.
If you observe, in most of the movies, the accent of the characters depends on where they come from.
An Indian will always have a hint of the innate ‘Indianness’ in his accent.
Moreover, you should not be trying to imitate the accent of a native speaker as there is no harm to have a slight influence of your regional accent in your speech.
However, if you are set on acquiring the native speaker’s accent, concentrate on the listening and speaking areas of the language (note: a language has four key areas – speaking, listening, reading and writing).
Try to listen to as much audio as you can get hands on.
English movies and videos on YouTube are a good way to go.
Try practicing everyday by repeating what you hear.
You can record your own voice to check and improve by yourself.
Listening and speaking practice is necessary, dedicating at least an hour a day.
This will slowly help you emulate the accent of a native English speaker.
On a different note, for improving your vocabulary, do check out the VoLT app.
It has a good collection of English words with techniques to remember them such as usage in a sentence, mnemonics, pictorial representation, etc:
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