How do I start writing scripts What are the processes involved in script writing

How do I start writing scripts? What are the processes involved in script writing?

Robert Grant gave a great answer! But I might add, along with watching tons of movies, it even more important to read the scripts.
So read tons of movie scripts.
Even bad ones, so you can learn why they're bad.
It will save you much agony and lot of time from writing equally bad scripts.

I know it sounds somewhat depressing if you were hoping for overnight success, or even short term success.
I mean, Diablo Cody was a success right out of the starting gate, but then, some people win lotteries.
After learning all you need to to technically write a screenplay, the long times it takes to get discovered come from trying to sell your script once you are ready to jump in the pool with the other 100,000 script writers out there.

I would suggest reading "The Art Of Dramatic Writing" by Lajos Egri.
It is the true screenwriter's bible, even though it's about plays.
If you read and understand that, you won't need to read any others for content, but maybe just for formatting.
My personal opinion is to stay away from Blake Snyder's "Save the Cat.
" While it does have some good advice if you want to write formulaic scripts to hopefully make money, it is also a prime example of how to stifle creativity and only write the lowest form of screenplay.
Okay, some great scripts have been written using this formula.
Some great cookies can be made with flour, water, and sugar.
But what about all the other ingredients that can go into making a great cookie?

These ideas the screenwriting gurus such as Syd Fields and Snyder put forth are all based on them deconstucting older screenplays to try and figure out why they worked so well.
It was like drawing images in clouds.
Once they found an image that fit their idea of how it "must" be, they enlisted everyone else to follow their examples.
This is why 99% of Hollywood films are all alike in their formatting, scene structure, and beat counts.
I'm not saying not to follow some of their advice, but learn enough to know what advice to follow.
Structure, in screenwriting is very important, but once you learn how how and why it works, you can vary it to come way with some truly marvelous scripts, ie.
.
.

Hiroshima Mon Amour
Memento
Donnie Darko
Chelsea Girls
Pulp Fiction
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Babel
Eraserhead
Raising Arizona
Crash
The Proposition
Adaptation
She's Gotta Have It

That's a very BIG question! If you mean technically/practically then, assuming you have an idea in mind, I'd start by reading a couple of books on the subject, then maybe take a class or two (by recognised screenwriting teachers) then start writing.
Watch a ton of films/tv and study the stories so you get a feel for good structure and how it works, make notes about scene order, exposition, dialogue, character types, set-up/pay-off, openings, endings etc.
and all the time keep on writing.
You might join a writers group (e.
g.
via MeetUp) so you can see other's work and share your writing for critique but basically there's no substitute for butt-in-chair-fingers-on-keyboard and get the writing done.
Your first few efforts will very likely be irredemably bad, but if you should persevere you will get better until eventually, if the gods are on your side and all the stars align, you sell something.
I reckon the average time to 'overnight success' is around 10-12 years.
Good luck!

Watch and explore numerous movies before you could start writing a script.
Connect with successful film makers and get to know them about their works.
Join the community here atLauri Donahue's answer to How do I become a good screenwriter?

How do I start writing scripts? What are the processes involved in script writing?

Watch and explore numerous movies before you could start writing a script.
Connect with successful film makers and get to know them about their works.
Join the community here atLauri Donahue's answer to How do I become a good screenwriter?

Updated: 27.06.2019 — 12:35 pm

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