How do I get in the habit of writing every day

How do I get in the habit of writing every day?

Here are 5 tips I use to get into the habit of writing everyday…
Panic.
Anxiety.
Despair.
Staring at a blank page can be terrifying…
Especially if you have to write for a living.
I know from personal experience.
But here are 5 simple tips I’ve used to help me write 2 best-selling books on Amazon, launch successful blogs, and create an email newsletter for DRIVEN entrepreneurs:
1).
Pretend You’re a Great Writer
:
Mindset is key to every accomplishment in life.
Imagine you’re a great writer that writes everyday.
Imagine how you would act first thing in the morning.
Imagine how you would deal with writer’s block.
Imagine the feeling of accomplishment as you complete your blog post, essay, or article.
Keep seeing yourself as an accomplished writer and imagine how you would act if you were one.
This sounds cheesy, but there’s a reason professional athletes and business people use this type of visualization, it works!
2).
Write Short Sentences (one line at at time)
:
Some of the best writing advice I’ve ever gotten is to write shorter sentences.
They are punchy.
They are emotional.
They are authentic.
Short sentences relieve the pressure of writing.
Don’t think of filling a blank page with words.
Think of writing just 10 words.
Then another 10.
Then another 10.
Do this and you’ll see how easy it is to get in the habit of writing.

3).
Read More (it activates your brain)
:
Reading activates your mind.
It gives you ideas to emulate.
It gives you perspective.
It energizes you.
When I have a hard time answering questions on Quora, I read answers from some of my favorite writers (Paul Carleton, Nicolas Cole, William Beteet III, Niklas Goke, Loy Machedo)
If you constantly read, you’ll never run out of ideas.

4).
Always Remember, You’re a Storyteller
:
Humans love stories.
We love stories with emotion even more.
As you go through your day, think about your experiences in the form of a story that you’ll tell.
What story can you share from the person that cut you off in traffic?
What story can you share about your child refusing to go to school in the morning?
What story can you share about an argument with your spouse?
What story can you share about losing a job or business deal?
5).
Learn to Love the Process
:
Most great writers LOVE the process.
They love coming up with ideas.
They love telling stories.
They love the deep work that’s required to be a great writer .
If you need help getting in the right mindset, downloadQuora and John Saddington, a tech entrepreneur and blogger who’s actually one of my old high school classmates, has been
Exercising your writing muscle at the same time every day eventually makes it an automatic habit.
I can attest to this.
Over the past couple of years, I've built a habit of writing in the morning before work and my output has increased dramatically.
Another thing that's helped me is writing in the same environment every day.

I write at the Dunkin’ Donuts by my work or the Starbucks by my house every day.
I’ve found it much easier to write in coffee shops than at home and that’s because I’ve trained myself to write there.
When I’m sitting down at Dunkin’ or Starbucks, I write.
That’s just what I do.
“More than 50% of the time when I sit down in front of this notebook and I try to write things down, it doesn’t come.

The “struggle” he describes is the writing process.

If someone who’s been writing every day for 15 years still struggles half of the time, then you will too.
But the important thing is that you can learn to grind through it, which brings me to his most important tip:
“If there’s anything I do differently from other people, it’s that when I sit down for that writing period, I don’t get up until I’ve actually written something.

John ships every day for one reason and one reason only.
It’s that he doesn’t allow himself not to.

Think about something you do every day because you won’t allow yourself not to.
Like feeding your children.
That’s what he does with writing.
“Most people who struggle with writing give up way to early.
They sit down.
They struggle.
And they quit.

What if you have nothing to write about?
You find something.
Here’s what I do when I have nothing to write about.

“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

This last piece of advice was really powerful.
Many doubts creep in when you’re first starting out with something, or even after you’ve been doing it for a while.
With writing, the obvious one is “What if I suck?”
I often think I suck at writing.
Especially when I look at someone like Tim Ferriss, who writes ginormous books that millions of people love.
Or James Altucher, who is so transparent with his thoughts and feelings in his writing that people in his own family don’t even talk to him anymore.
Or J.
K.
Rowling who turned her imagination into a billion dollar empire.
These doubts can easily derail your writing habit if you let them.
But just think about that quote.
“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

Then, keep writing.
ALYG

Writing every day is an INCREDIBLY useful activity and it is definitely worth taking the time to make a habit.
I quickly want to say why it’s so useful, and then I’ll delve into how to actually implement it as a habit in your life.
The main benefits of writing every day are:
(1) Helps you organize your life so that it conforms to your goals.
(2) Gives you an outlet that allows you to express what you’re feeling internally and put it into words rather than just “feeling” it – which gives you a chance to evaluate your own feelings.
(3) Invites self-discipline through struggling to do it everyday.
(4) It’s relaxing.
Now, how do you go actually go about making a habit out of writing every single day?
Altering our habits is really, really difficult.
It takes time, it takes patience, and it takes truly wanting to get something out of it.
Step 1: Why are you making the decision to write every day?
When we don’t know the reasons we want to make positive changes in our lives, we tend to quickly stop taking the positive actions we decided to take.
The WHY, the REASON you want to start writing is the emotional fuel you need to actually stick to doing it consistently.
Taking action on this step – Answer these questions:
Step 2: Choose a time
To effectively add a habit, consistency is crucial.
If you really want to start writing every day, you need to choose a time of day that you’re going to write every single day.
Your mind and body need to adapt in such a way that when the hour you usually write comes around, you’re already prepared for it, you’re looking forward to it.
It isn’t important when you decide, as long as you make a definitive determination about when you know you have the time on most days, and actually stick to it.
BUT, any time you can’t get to writing at the hour you decide, don’t make it an excuse not to do your writing.
You have to have an all or nothing mentality.
You have to make the decision that nothing is going to stop you from doing your habit every day.
Action steps to take:
Step 3: What are you going to write about?
If you don’t know what you’re going to write about – forget about trying to make a habit out of it.
You can’t just decide “I want to start writing” without having at least some idea of what you want to express on paper.
You don’t have to have planned writing topics, but based on the reasons you want to write in the first place (using the questions above), you can come up with a general idea of the kind of things you want to talk to yourself about.
Action steps to take:
Personally, writing serves as a way to keep my work and my life organized.
I have a journal that I write in every single night and morning that helps me plan my days so that I don’t have to think about what it is I’m going to do in the morning adn throughout the day.
I create my routine for every morning, and at night I sit and dwell about what waking up early with a written routine really did for me.
I think about the day I just had and what points of the day I simply wasn’t enjoying.
I think about the best times of the day and what the contrast is between the moments I enjoy in life and the moments I don’t enjoy.
I actually created a journalQuora and John Saddington, a tech entrepreneur and blogger who’s actually one of my old high school classmates, has been
Exercising your writing muscle at the same time every day eventually makes it an automatic habit.
I can attest to this.
Over the past couple of years, I've built a habit of writing in the morning before work and my output has increased dramatically.
Another thing that's helped me is writing in the same environment every day.

I write at the Dunkin’ Donuts by my work or the Starbucks by my house every day.
I’ve found it much easier to write in coffee shops than at home and that’s because I’ve trained myself to write there.
When I’m sitting down at Dunkin’ or Starbucks, I write.
That’s just what I do.
“More than 50% of the time when I sit down in front of this notebook and I try to write things down, it doesn’t come.

The “struggle” he describes is the writing process.

If someone who’s been writing every day for 15 years still struggles half of the time, then you will too.
But the important thing is that you can learn to grind through it, which brings me to his most important tip:
“If there’s anything I do differently from other people, it’s that when I sit down for that writing period, I don’t get up until I’ve actually written something.

John ships every day for one reason and one reason only.
It’s that he doesn’t allow himself not to.

Think about something you do every day because you won’t allow yourself not to.
Like feeding your children.
That’s what he does with writing.
“Most people who struggle with writing give up way to early.
They sit down.
They struggle.
And they quit.

What if you have nothing to write about?
You find something.
Here’s what I do when I have nothing to write about.

“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

This last piece of advice was really powerful.
Many doubts creep in when you’re first starting out with something, or even after you’ve been doing it for a while.
With writing, the obvious one is “What if I suck?”
I often think I suck at writing.
Especially when I look at someone like Tim Ferriss, who writes ginormous books that millions of people love.
Or James Altucher, who is so transparent with his thoughts and feelings in his writing that people in his own family don’t even talk to him anymore.
Or J.
K.
Rowling who turned her imagination into a billion dollar empire.
These doubts can easily derail your writing habit if you let them.
But just think about that quote.
“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

Then, keep writing.
ALYG

Writing every day is an INCREDIBLY useful activity and it is definitely worth taking the time to make a habit.
I quickly want to say why it’s so useful, and then I’ll delve into how to actually implement it as a habit in your life.
The main benefits of writing every day are:
(1) Helps you organize your life so that it conforms to your goals.
(2) Gives you an outlet that allows you to express what you’re feeling internally and put it into words rather than just “feeling” it – which gives you a chance to evaluate your own feelings.
(3) Invites self-discipline through struggling to do it everyday.
(4) It’s relaxing.
Now, how do you go actually go about making a habit out of writing every single day?
Altering our habits is really, really difficult.
It takes time, it takes patience, and it takes truly wanting to get something out of it.
Step 1: Why are you making the decision to write every day?
When we don’t know the reasons we want to make positive changes in our lives, we tend to quickly stop taking the positive actions we decided to take.
The WHY, the REASON you want to start writing is the emotional fuel you need to actually stick to doing it consistently.
Taking action on this step – Answer these questions:
Step 2: Choose a time
To effectively add a habit, consistency is crucial.
If you really want to start writing every day, you need to choose a time of day that you’re going to write every single day.
Your mind and body need to adapt in such a way that when the hour you usually write comes around, you’re already prepared for it, you’re looking forward to it.
It isn’t important when you decide, as long as you make a definitive determination about when you know you have the time on most days, and actually stick to it.
BUT, any time you can’t get to writing at the hour you decide, don’t make it an excuse not to do your writing.
You have to have an all or nothing mentality.
You have to make the decision that nothing is going to stop you from doing your habit every day.
Action steps to take:
Step 3: What are you going to write about?
If you don’t know what you’re going to write about – forget about trying to make a habit out of it.
You can’t just decide “I want to start writing” without having at least some idea of what you want to express on paper.
You don’t have to have planned writing topics, but based on the reasons you want to write in the first place (using the questions above), you can come up with a general idea of the kind of things you want to talk to yourself about.
Action steps to take:
Personally, writing serves as a way to keep my work and my life organized.
I have a journal that I write in every single night and morning that helps me plan my days so that I don’t have to think about what it is I’m going to do in the morning adn throughout the day.
I create my routine for every morning, and at night I sit and dwell about what waking up early with a written routine really did for me.
I think about the day I just had and what points of the day I simply wasn’t enjoying.
I think about the best times of the day and what the contrast is between the moments I enjoy in life and the moments I don’t enjoy.
I actually created a journal[1]
Identity: Become the type of person who writes 1,000 words every day.
Small win: Write one paragraph each day this week.
So make it super easy for you.
Anchor a daily writing habit into your existing morning routine.
Do an implementation intention and say:
“After [CURRENT HABIT], I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION] (or also duration.
)”
For example, after I got my morning coffee I will sit down on my desk and write in my word file for 15 mins or until I have one paragraph.

Make it easy and visible for you so you can stick to it.
Over time you will build up momentum and can increase the amount you write.
This will change your identity.
You will become a person who writes every day.
Hope that helps,
Kilian
Want to take charge of your habits?
Join my “Habit Mastermind” group for entrepreneurs & busy professionals here.

If these ideas resonate with you, let me know your thoughts in a quick comment below.
I’d love to connect with you!

I used to be afraid of writing.
I would agonize over every word, rewriting my sentences over and over, and repeatedly rearranging my ideas.
I hated writing.
I hated writing because there was no right answer, and I felt like no matter how I said something, there was a better way.
But I couldn’t figure out what that better way was.
In AP English my senior year of high school, I never turned a single paper in on time.
During my portfolio review at the end of the year, my teacher expressed grave concern.
How would I make it through college if I couldn’t get my papers in on time? Easy.
I’d study engineering.
I had it all figured out for a while because studying engineering meant I didn’t have to write much.
When I did have to write, it was mostly just labs.
Those were easy.
Also, in Technical Writing, I got an A+.
That was relatively painless because our professor gave us so much structure.
But when it comes to writing that matters, writing meant to communicate, writing meant to be creative, I really struggled.
I even struggled with emails.
It’s hard to figure out how to say things.
But, you know, maybe I was trying too hard.
Ever since I got an iPhone, I’ve been writing a lot.
It hasn’t been how you think.
For the longest time, I didn’t even realize what I was doing.
I was just texting.
But because the iPhone keypad enabled me to text so quickly and efficiently, I started texting a lot.
For the longest time, I thought my overly verbose texting was a problem.
And maybe it is.
People have found it annoying.
But ultimately it has been a form of writing practice.
It has been a way to write without worrying so much about saying things perfectly.
Often I just text stream of consciousness.
Then one day I realized I could simply write the way I text.
Maybe my writing isn’t perfect.
But it is easy.
And I’m certainly very prolific.
If you can text every day, you certainly can write every day.
Well, actually if you are texting, you already are writing every day, but it sounds like you want to be generating higher volume.
So every time you have a thought or idea, just type it into your phone.

Here is a cool technique to start writing daily.
If you’re writing a novel or working on a long term literary project.
Often comes the day when you do not feel like writing at all and it happens (Don’t worry).
On such days try writing something else; but WRITE!
Write a tiny tale/conversation/poem around any thought that pops up in your mind.
It could even be any funny/inspiring/worth-sharing incidents from your past.
(Keep it short.
Pour your imagination.
Let your creative heart perform the pirouette.
)
Soon you might as well have a nice collection of poetry/short stories.
Cherish your work.
Join yourquote or you can even make an instagram page.
It will keep your writing alive and so the interest inside you.
I do it daily apart from writing my novel.
It’s refreshing and gives you an absolute sense as a writer.
Here is one piece of conversation from my collection

Developing a habit is as simple as incorporating it into your day.
Write a lot.
Write EVERY SINGLE DAY, even if it is only for 15 minutes.
Get in the HABIT of sitting down at the computer and turning off your phone and writing.
Write different things.
For Improving:
Get critiqued.
One way is to go somewhere like Reddit, which has a whole sub for writing prompts (r/writingprompts) and get tons of different prompts and styles.
Try writing in different styles and from different perspectives.
For example, write a short story however you want and then come back and write the SAME story but from a different character’s perspective.
Or write a story in third person and come back and write the same story in first person.
What do they not know that the narrator knew? How does knowing her thoughts change what the reader knows about her motivations?
Another similar exercise is to rewrite a story you read somewhere (an existing story, and just for practice) from the perspective of a non-main character.

What I have read about writers over and over again, is that they have very strict writing schedules.
It is easy to get distracted, but serious, successful writers keep at it every day.
I have consistantly read that it is important to write every single day at the same time and place set aside just for writing.
Writers have said they may not have anything specific to write about, a project they are working on, but they write anyway.
It keeps their mind open, exercised, and ready for writing.
It can keep writer's block at bay; the kiss of death for a writer.
Some writers who have families and jobs get up very early every morning and write before anyone else is up, before work.
Some writers have to wait until after their regular job.
They write at night for a few hours after everyone has gone to bed.
More successful, established writers who write for a living, set working hours just like an office or regular job.
They get up in the morning, get dressed in working clothes, have breakfast, then go to work at home.
It could be an extra room set aside as an office.
It could be a place away from home where they work at their writing job.
Some lucky writers have little rooms built in their backyard as their writing studio.
Whatever, wherever a writer has set aside for work, a quiet place they can concentrate, it is as important as any “regular" workplace area.
Beginning, new writers read books that successful writers have written about their writing life.
It is helpful when you are getting started.
But the most important part of writing, is actually writing.
Perseverance, discipline, dedication, is the key to successful writing.
Just do it!

Hi! While I know neither your personal schedule or what kind of writing you are interested in, here are a few simple tips I followed while writing my first two novels.
After a certain time, routine takes over.
The best of luck,
Bella

How do I get in the habit of writing every day?

Here are 5 tips I use to get into the habit of writing everyday…
Panic.
Anxiety.
Despair.
Staring at a blank page can be terrifying…
Especially if you have to write for a living.
I know from personal experience.
But here are 5 simple tips I’ve used to help me write 2 best-selling books on Amazon, launch successful blogs, and create an email newsletter for DRIVEN entrepreneurs:
1).
Pretend You’re a Great Writer
:
Mindset is key to every accomplishment in life.
Imagine you’re a great writer that writes everyday.
Imagine how you would act first thing in the morning.
Imagine how you would deal with writer’s block.
Imagine the feeling of accomplishment as you complete your blog post, essay, or article.
Keep seeing yourself as an accomplished writer and imagine how you would act if you were one.
This sounds cheesy, but there’s a reason professional athletes and business people use this type of visualization, it works!
2).
Write Short Sentences (one line at at time)
:
Some of the best writing advice I’ve ever gotten is to write shorter sentences.
They are punchy.
They are emotional.
They are authentic.
Short sentences relieve the pressure of writing.
Don’t think of filling a blank page with words.
Think of writing just 10 words.
Then another 10.
Then another 10.
Do this and you’ll see how easy it is to get in the habit of writing.

3).
Read More (it activates your brain)
:
Reading activates your mind.
It gives you ideas to emulate.
It gives you perspective.
It energizes you.
When I have a hard time answering questions on Quora, I read answers from some of my favorite writers (
Paul Carleton, Nicolas Cole, William Beteet III, Niklas Goke, Loy Machedo)
If you constantly read, you’ll never run out of ideas.

4).
Always Remember, You’re a Storyteller
:
Humans love stories.
We love stories with emotion even more.
As you go through your day, think about your experiences in the form of a story that you’ll tell.
What story can you share from the person that cut you off in traffic?
What story can you share about your child refusing to go to school in the morning?
What story can you share about an argument with your spouse?
What story can you share about losing a job or business deal?
5).
Learn to Love the Process
:
Most great writers LOVE the process.
They love coming up with ideas.
They love telling stories.
They love the deep work that’s required to be a great writer .
If you need help getting in the right mindset, downloadQuora and John Saddington, a tech entrepreneur and blogger who’s actually one of my old high school classmates, has been
Exercising your writing muscle at the same time every day eventually makes it an automatic habit.
I can attest to this.
Over the past couple of years, I've built a habit of writing in the morning before work and my output has increased dramatically.
Another thing that's helped me is writing in the same environment every day.

I write at the Dunkin’ Donuts by my work or the Starbucks by my house every day.
I’ve found it much easier to write in coffee shops than at home and that’s because I’ve trained myself to write there.
When I’m sitting down at Dunkin’ or Starbucks, I write.
That’s just what I do.
“More than 50% of the time when I sit down in front of this notebook and I try to write things down, it doesn’t come.

The “struggle” he describes is the writing process.

If someone who’s been writing every day for 15 years still struggles half of the time, then you will too.
But the important thing is that you can learn to grind through it, which brings me to his most important tip:
“If there’s anything I do differently from other people, it’s that when I sit down for that writing period, I don’t get up until I’ve actually written something.

John ships every day for one reason and one reason only.
It’s that he doesn’t allow himself not to.

Think about something you do every day because you won’t allow yourself not to.
Like feeding your children.
That’s what he does with writing.
“Most people who struggle with writing give up way to early.
They sit down.
They struggle.
And they quit.

What if you have nothing to write about?
You find something.
Here’s what I do when I have nothing to write about.

“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

This last piece of advice was really powerful.
Many doubts creep in when you’re first starting out with something, or even after you’ve been doing it for a while.
With writing, the obvious one is “What if I suck?”
I often think I suck at writing.
Especially when I look at someone like Tim Ferriss, who writes ginormous books that millions of people love.
Or James Altucher, who is so transparent with his thoughts and feelings in his writing that people in his own family don’t even talk to him anymore.
Or J.
K.
Rowling who turned her imagination into a billion dollar empire.
These doubts can easily derail your writing habit if you let them.
But just think about that quote.
“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

Then, keep writing.
ALYG

Writing every day is an INCREDIBLY useful activity and it is definitely worth taking the time to make a habit.
I quickly want to say why it’s so useful, and then I’ll delve into how to actually implement it as a habit in your life.
The main benefits of writing every day are:
(1) Helps you organize your life so that it conforms to your goals.
(2) Gives you an outlet that allows you to express what you’re feeling internally and put it into words rather than just “feeling” it – which gives you a chance to evaluate your own feelings.
(3) Invites self-discipline through struggling to do it everyday.
(4) It’s relaxing.
Now, how do you go actually go about making a habit out of writing every single day?
Altering our habits is really, really difficult.
It takes time, it takes patience, and it takes truly wanting to get something out of it.
Step 1: Why are you making the decision to write every day?
When we don’t know the reasons we want to make positive changes in our lives, we tend to quickly stop taking the positive actions we decided to take.
The WHY, the REASON you want to start writing is the emotional fuel you need to actually stick to doing it consistently.
Taking action on this step – Answer these questions:
Step 2: Choose a time
To effectively add a habit, consistency is crucial.
If you really want to start writing every day, you need to choose a time of day that you’re going to write every single day.
Your mind and body need to adapt in such a way that when the hour you usually write comes around, you’re already prepared for it, you’re looking forward to it.
It isn’t important when you decide, as long as you make a definitive determination about when you know you have the time on most days, and actually stick to it.
BUT, any time you can’t get to writing at the hour you decide, don’t make it an excuse not to do your writing.
You have to have an all or nothing mentality.
You have to make the decision that nothing is going to stop you from doing your habit every day.
Action steps to take:
Step 3: What are you going to write about?
If you don’t know what you’re going to write about – forget about trying to make a habit out of it.
You can’t just decide “I want to start writing” without having at least some idea of what you want to express on paper.
You don’t have to have planned writing topics, but based on the reasons you want to write in the first place (using the questions above), you can come up with a general idea of the kind of things you want to talk to yourself about.
Action steps to take:
Personally, writing serves as a way to keep my work and my life organized.
I have a journal that I write in every single night and morning that helps me plan my days so that I don’t have to think about what it is I’m going to do in the morning adn throughout the day.
I create my routine for every morning, and at night I sit and dwell about what waking up early with a written routine really did for me.
I think about the day I just had and what points of the day I simply wasn’t enjoying.
I think about the best times of the day and what the contrast is between the moments I enjoy in life and the moments I don’t enjoy.
I actually created a journal[1]
Identity: Become the type of person who writes 1,000 words every day.
Small win: Write one paragraph each day this week.
So make it super easy for you.
Anchor a daily writing habit into your existing morning routine.
Do an implementation intention and say:
“After [CURRENT HABIT], I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION] (or also duration.
)”
For example, after I got my morning coffee I will sit down on my desk and write in my word file for 15 mins or until I have one paragraph.

Make it easy and visible for you so you can stick to it.
Over time you will build up momentum and can increase the amount you write.
This will change your identity.
You will become a person who writes every day.
Hope that helps,
Kilian
Want to take charge of your habits?
Join my “Habit Mastermind” group for entrepreneurs & busy professionals here.

If these ideas resonate with you, let me know your thoughts in a quick comment below.
I’d love to connect with you!

I used to be afraid of writing.
I would agonize over every word, rewriting my sentences over and over, and repeatedly rearranging my ideas.
I hated writing.
I hated writing because there was no right answer, and I felt like no matter how I said something, there was a better way.
But I couldn’t figure out what that better way was.
In AP English my senior year of high school, I never turned a single paper in on time.
During my portfolio review at the end of the year, my teacher expressed grave concern.
How would I make it through college if I couldn’t get my papers in on time? Easy.
I’d study engineering.
I had it all figured out for a while because studying engineering meant I didn’t have to write much.
When I did have to write, it was mostly just labs.
Those were easy.
Also, in Technical Writing, I got an A+.
That was relatively painless because our professor gave us so much structure.
But when it comes to writing that matters, writing meant to communicate, writing meant to be creative, I really struggled.
I even struggled with emails.
It’s hard to figure out how to say things.
But, you know, maybe I was trying too hard.
Ever since I got an iPhone, I’ve been writing a lot.
It hasn’t been how you think.
For the longest time, I didn’t even realize what I was doing.
I was just texting.
But because the iPhone keypad enabled me to text so quickly and efficiently, I started texting a lot.
For the longest time, I thought my overly verbose texting was a problem.
And maybe it is.
People have found it annoying.
But ultimately it has been a form of writing practice.
It has been a way to write without worrying so much about saying things perfectly.
Often I just text stream of consciousness.
Then one day I realized I could simply write the way I text.
Maybe my writing isn’t perfect.
But it is easy.
And I’m certainly very prolific.
If you can text every day, you certainly can write every day.
Well, actually if you are texting, you already are writing every day, but it sounds like you want to be generating higher volume.
So every time you have a thought or idea, just type it into your phone.

Here is a cool technique to start writing daily.
If you’re writing a novel or working on a long term literary project.
Often comes the day when you do not feel like writing at all and it happens (Don’t worry).
On such days try writing something else; but WRITE!
Write a tiny tale/conversation/poem around any thought that pops up in your mind.
It could even be any funny/inspiring/worth-sharing incidents from your past.
(Keep it short.
Pour your imagination.
Let your creative heart perform the pirouette.
)
Soon you might as well have a nice collection of poetry/short stories.
Cherish your work.
Join yourquote or you can even make an instagram page.
It will keep your writing alive and so the interest inside you.
I do it daily apart from writing my novel.
It’s refreshing and gives you an absolute sense as a writer.
Here is one piece of conversation from my collection

Developing a habit is as simple as incorporating it into your day.
Write a lot.
Write EVERY SINGLE DAY, even if it is only for 15 minutes.
Get in the HABIT of sitting down at the computer and turning off your phone and writing.
Write different things.
For Improving:
Get critiqued.
One way is to go somewhere like Reddit, which has a whole sub for writing prompts (r/writingprompts) and get tons of different prompts and styles.
Try writing in different styles and from different perspectives.
For example, write a short story however you want and then come back and write the SAME story but from a different character’s perspective.
Or write a story in third person and come back and write the same story in first person.
What do they not know that the narrator knew? How does knowing her thoughts change what the reader knows about her motivations?
Another similar exercise is to rewrite a story you read somewhere (an existing story, and just for practice) from the perspective of a non-main character.

What I have read about writers over and over again, is that they have very strict writing schedules.
It is easy to get distracted, but serious, successful writers keep at it every day.
I have consistantly read that it is important to write every single day at the same time and place set aside just for writing.
Writers have said they may not have anything specific to write about, a project they are working on, but they write anyway.
It keeps their mind open, exercised, and ready for writing.
It can keep writer's block at bay; the kiss of death for a writer.
Some writers who have families and jobs get up very early every morning and write before anyone else is up, before work.
Some writers have to wait until after their regular job.
They write at night for a few hours after everyone has gone to bed.
More successful, established writers who write for a living, set working hours just like an office or regular job.
They get up in the morning, get dressed in working clothes, have breakfast, then go to work at home.
It could be an extra room set aside as an office.
It could be a place away from home where they work at their writing job.
Some lucky writers have little rooms built in their backyard as their writing studio.
Whatever, wherever a writer has set aside for work, a quiet place they can concentrate, it is as important as any “regular" workplace area.
Beginning, new writers read books that successful writers have written about their writing life.
It is helpful when you are getting started.
But the most important part of writing, is actually writing.
Perseverance, discipline, dedication, is the key to successful writing.
Just do it!

Hi! While I know neither your personal schedule or what kind of writing you are interested in, here are a few simple tips I followed while writing my first two novels.
After a certain time, routine takes over.
The best of luck,
Bella

If seriously interested in writing, then it’s an addiction if not controlled to be your friend rather than your master.
So the word habit can be used to mean an addiction rather than a discipline leading towards success, even if not gaining it or getting paid for it.
QUORA doesn’t pay us for answers, but can for interesting questions, should anyone bother with the partnership enough to create great questions rather than silly ones.
Writing is helpful as a creative exercise even if nothing gets published.
Some writers just write for the sake of it, like it’s art for art’s sake rather than a blessing to help our fellow man.
If seeking to impress others with how clever we are, then go for it.
Pretty soon the confidence increases and it’s time to move on towards more noble ambitions like helping others whether getting paid or not.
The spirit is rewarded even if the bank account isn’t.
Writing, for me, is more poetry writing and sharing ideas on the Internet.
So I’m not that eager to start a novel and lose hundreds of hours that way.
There are billions of ideas out there, so isn’t that a great incentive to write and compete with that little lot? Non fiction is more disciplined and life is too short for some of us as it is.
It’s like starting to read WAR AND PEACE.
Imagine trying to write it!
If motivated by God to write then I can understand the point of many a book being started.
The nearest I got was the poemhunter poetry website offering visitors my free to download e-book file of my poetry collection for the last few years I’ve been online.
See the e-book link at the top of the webpage list of poem titles here:
Paul Carleton, Nicolas Cole, William Beteet III, Niklas Goke, Loy Machedo)
If you constantly read, you’ll never run out of ideas.

4).
Always Remember, You’re a Storyteller
:
Humans love stories.
We love stories with emotion even more.
As you go through your day, think about your experiences in the form of a story that you’ll tell.
What story can you share from the person that cut you off in traffic?
What story can you share about your child refusing to go to school in the morning?
What story can you share about an argument with your spouse?
What story can you share about losing a job or business deal?
5).
Learn to Love the Process
:
Most great writers LOVE the process.
They love coming up with ideas.
They love telling stories.
They love the deep work that’s required to be a great writer .
If you need help getting in the right mindset, downloadQuora and John Saddington, a tech entrepreneur and blogger who’s actually one of my old high school classmates, has been
Exercising your writing muscle at the same time every day eventually makes it an automatic habit.
I can attest to this.
Over the past couple of years, I've built a habit of writing in the morning before work and my output has increased dramatically.
Another thing that's helped me is writing in the same environment every day.

I write at the Dunkin’ Donuts by my work or the Starbucks by my house every day.
I’ve found it much easier to write in coffee shops than at home and that’s because I’ve trained myself to write there.
When I’m sitting down at Dunkin’ or Starbucks, I write.
That’s just what I do.
“More than 50% of the time when I sit down in front of this notebook and I try to write things down, it doesn’t come.

The “struggle” he describes is the writing process.

If someone who’s been writing every day for 15 years still struggles half of the time, then you will too.
But the important thing is that you can learn to grind through it, which brings me to his most important tip:
“If there’s anything I do differently from other people, it’s that when I sit down for that writing period, I don’t get up until I’ve actually written something.

John ships every day for one reason and one reason only.
It’s that he doesn’t allow himself not to.

Think about something you do every day because you won’t allow yourself not to.
Like feeding your children.
That’s what he does with writing.
“Most people who struggle with writing give up way to early.
They sit down.
They struggle.
And they quit.

What if you have nothing to write about?
You find something.
Here’s what I do when I have nothing to write about.

“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

This last piece of advice was really powerful.
Many doubts creep in when you’re first starting out with something, or even after you’ve been doing it for a while.
With writing, the obvious one is “What if I suck?”
I often think I suck at writing.
Especially when I look at someone like Tim Ferriss, who writes ginormous books that millions of people love.
Or James Altucher, who is so transparent with his thoughts and feelings in his writing that people in his own family don’t even talk to him anymore.
Or J.
K.
Rowling who turned her imagination into a billion dollar empire.
These doubts can easily derail your writing habit if you let them.
But just think about that quote.
“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

Then, keep writing.
ALYG

Writing every day is an INCREDIBLY useful activity and it is definitely worth taking the time to make a habit.
I quickly want to say why it’s so useful, and then I’ll delve into how to actually implement it as a habit in your life.
The main benefits of writing every day are:
(1) Helps you organize your life so that it conforms to your goals.
(2) Gives you an outlet that allows you to express what you’re feeling internally and put it into words rather than just “feeling” it – which gives you a chance to evaluate your own feelings.
(3) Invites self-discipline through struggling to do it everyday.
(4) It’s relaxing.
Now, how do you go actually go about making a habit out of writing every single day?
Altering our habits is really, really difficult.
It takes time, it takes patience, and it takes truly wanting to get something out of it.
Step 1: Why are you making the decision to write every day?
When we don’t know the reasons we want to make positive changes in our lives, we tend to quickly stop taking the positive actions we decided to take.
The WHY, the REASON you want to start writing is the emotional fuel you need to actually stick to doing it consistently.
Taking action on this step – Answer these questions:
Step 2: Choose a time
To effectively add a habit, consistency is crucial.
If you really want to start writing every day, you need to choose a time of day that you’re going to write every single day.
Your mind and body need to adapt in such a way that when the hour you usually write comes around, you’re already prepared for it, you’re looking forward to it.
It isn’t important when you decide, as long as you make a definitive determination about when you know you have the time on most days, and actually stick to it.
BUT, any time you can’t get to writing at the hour you decide, don’t make it an excuse not to do your writing.
You have to have an all or nothing mentality.
You have to make the decision that nothing is going to stop you from doing your habit every day.
Action steps to take:
Step 3: What are you going to write about?
If you don’t know what you’re going to write about – forget about trying to make a habit out of it.
You can’t just decide “I want to start writing” without having at least some idea of what you want to express on paper.
You don’t have to have planned writing topics, but based on the reasons you want to write in the first place (using the questions above), you can come up with a general idea of the kind of things you want to talk to yourself about.
Action steps to take:
Personally, writing serves as a way to keep my work and my life organized.
I have a journal that I write in every single night and morning that helps me plan my days so that I don’t have to think about what it is I’m going to do in the morning adn throughout the day.
I create my routine for every morning, and at night I sit and dwell about what waking up early with a written routine really did for me.
I think about the day I just had and what points of the day I simply wasn’t enjoying.
I think about the best times of the day and what the contrast is between the moments I enjoy in life and the moments I don’t enjoy.
I actually created a journal[1]
Identity: Become the type of person who writes 1,000 words every day.
Small win: Write one paragraph each day this week.
So make it super easy for you.
Anchor a daily writing habit into your existing morning routine.
Do an implementation intention and say:
“After [CURRENT HABIT], I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION] (or also duration.
)”
For example, after I got my morning coffee I will sit down on my desk and write in my word file for 15 mins or until I have one paragraph.

Make it easy and visible for you so you can stick to it.
Over time you will build up momentum and can increase the amount you write.
This will change your identity.
You will become a person who writes every day.
Hope that helps,
Kilian
Want to take charge of your habits?
Join my “Habit Mastermind” group for entrepreneurs & busy professionals here.

If these ideas resonate with you, let me know your thoughts in a quick comment below.
I’d love to connect with you!

I used to be afraid of writing.
I would agonize over every word, rewriting my sentences over and over, and repeatedly rearranging my ideas.
I hated writing.
I hated writing because there was no right answer, and I felt like no matter how I said something, there was a better way.
But I couldn’t figure out what that better way was.
In AP English my senior year of high school, I never turned a single paper in on time.
During my portfolio review at the end of the year, my teacher expressed grave concern.
How would I make it through college if I couldn’t get my papers in on time? Easy.
I’d study engineering.
I had it all figured out for a while because studying engineering meant I didn’t have to write much.
When I did have to write, it was mostly just labs.
Those were easy.
Also, in Technical Writing, I got an A+.
That was relatively painless because our professor gave us so much structure.
But when it comes to writing that matters, writing meant to communicate, writing meant to be creative, I really struggled.
I even struggled with emails.
It’s hard to figure out how to say things.
But, you know, maybe I was trying too hard.
Ever since I got an iPhone, I’ve been writing a lot.
It hasn’t been how you think.
For the longest time, I didn’t even realize what I was doing.
I was just texting.
But because the iPhone keypad enabled me to text so quickly and efficiently, I started texting a lot.
For the longest time, I thought my overly verbose texting was a problem.
And maybe it is.
People have found it annoying.
But ultimately it has been a form of writing practice.
It has been a way to write without worrying so much about saying things perfectly.
Often I just text stream of consciousness.
Then one day I realized I could simply write the way I text.
Maybe my writing isn’t perfect.
But it is easy.
And I’m certainly very prolific.
If you can text every day, you certainly can write every day.
Well, actually if you are texting, you already are writing every day, but it sounds like you want to be generating higher volume.
So every time you have a thought or idea, just type it into your phone.

Here is a cool technique to start writing daily.
If you’re writing a novel or working on a long term literary project.
Often comes the day when you do not feel like writing at all and it happens (Don’t worry).
On such days try writing something else; but WRITE!
Write a tiny tale/conversation/poem around any thought that pops up in your mind.
It could even be any funny/inspiring/worth-sharing incidents from your past.
(Keep it short.
Pour your imagination.
Let your creative heart perform the pirouette.
)
Soon you might as well have a nice collection of poetry/short stories.
Cherish your work.
Join yourquote or you can even make an instagram page.
It will keep your writing alive and so the interest inside you.
I do it daily apart from writing my novel.
It’s refreshing and gives you an absolute sense as a writer.
Here is one piece of conversation from my collection

Developing a habit is as simple as incorporating it into your day.
Write a lot.
Write EVERY SINGLE DAY, even if it is only for 15 minutes.
Get in the HABIT of sitting down at the computer and turning off your phone and writing.
Write different things.
For Improving:
Get critiqued.
One way is to go somewhere like Reddit, which has a whole sub for writing prompts (r/writingprompts) and get tons of different prompts and styles.
Try writing in different styles and from different perspectives.
For example, write a short story however you want and then come back and write the SAME story but from a different character’s perspective.
Or write a story in third person and come back and write the same story in first person.
What do they not know that the narrator knew? How does knowing her thoughts change what the reader knows about her motivations?
Another similar exercise is to rewrite a story you read somewhere (an existing story, and just for practice) from the perspective of a non-main character.

What I have read about writers over and over again, is that they have very strict writing schedules.
It is easy to get distracted, but serious, successful writers keep at it every day.
I have consistantly read that it is important to write every single day at the same time and place set aside just for writing.
Writers have said they may not have anything specific to write about, a project they are working on, but they write anyway.
It keeps their mind open, exercised, and ready for writing.
It can keep writer's block at bay; the kiss of death for a writer.
Some writers who have families and jobs get up very early every morning and write before anyone else is up, before work.
Some writers have to wait until after their regular job.
They write at night for a few hours after everyone has gone to bed.
More successful, established writers who write for a living, set working hours just like an office or regular job.
They get up in the morning, get dressed in working clothes, have breakfast, then go to work at home.
It could be an extra room set aside as an office.
It could be a place away from home where they work at their writing job.
Some lucky writers have little rooms built in their backyard as their writing studio.
Whatever, wherever a writer has set aside for work, a quiet place they can concentrate, it is as important as any “regular" workplace area.
Beginning, new writers read books that successful writers have written about their writing life.
It is helpful when you are getting started.
But the most important part of writing, is actually writing.
Perseverance, discipline, dedication, is the key to successful writing.
Just do it!

Hi! While I know neither your personal schedule or what kind of writing you are interested in, here are a few simple tips I followed while writing my first two novels.
After a certain time, routine takes over.
The best of luck,
Bella

If seriously interested in writing, then it’s an addiction if not controlled to be your friend rather than your master.
So the word habit can be used to mean an addiction rather than a discipline leading towards success, even if not gaining it or getting paid for it.
QUORA doesn’t pay us for answers, but can for interesting questions, should anyone bother with the partnership enough to create great questions rather than silly ones.
Writing is helpful as a creative exercise even if nothing gets published.
Some writers just write for the sake of it, like it’s art for art’s sake rather than a blessing to help our fellow man.
If seeking to impress others with how clever we are, then go for it.
Pretty soon the confidence increases and it’s time to move on towards more noble ambitions like helping others whether getting paid or not.
The spirit is rewarded even if the bank account isn’t.
Writing, for me, is more poetry writing and sharing ideas on the Internet.
So I’m not that eager to start a novel and lose hundreds of hours that way.
There are billions of ideas out there, so isn’t that a great incentive to write and compete with that little lot? Non fiction is more disciplined and life is too short for some of us as it is.
It’s like starting to read WAR AND PEACE.
Imagine trying to write it!
If motivated by God to write then I can understand the point of many a book being started.
The nearest I got was the poemhunter poetry website offering visitors my free to download e-book file of my poetry collection for the last few years I’ve been online.
See the e-book link at the top of the webpage list of poem titles here:
Paul Carleton, Nicolas Cole, William Beteet III, Niklas Goke, Loy Machedo)
If you constantly read, you’ll never run out of ideas.

4).
Always Remember, You’re a Storyteller
:
Humans love stories.
We love stories with emotion even more.
As you go through your day, think about your experiences in the form of a story that you’ll tell.
What story can you share from the person that cut you off in traffic?
What story can you share about your child refusing to go to school in the morning?
What story can you share about an argument with your spouse?
What story can you share about losing a job or business deal?
5).
Learn to Love the Process
:
Most great writers LOVE the process.
They love coming up with ideas.
They love telling stories.
They love the deep work that’s required to be a great writer .
If you need help getting in the right mindset, downloadQuora and John Saddington, a tech entrepreneur and blogger who’s actually one of my old high school classmates, has been
Exercising your writing muscle at the same time every day eventually makes it an automatic habit.
I can attest to this.
Over the past couple of years, I've built a habit of writing in the morning before work and my output has increased dramatically.
Another thing that's helped me is writing in the same environment every day.

I write at the Dunkin’ Donuts by my work or the Starbucks by my house every day.
I’ve found it much easier to write in coffee shops than at home and that’s because I’ve trained myself to write there.
When I’m sitting down at Dunkin’ or Starbucks, I write.
That’s just what I do.
“More than 50% of the time when I sit down in front of this notebook and I try to write things down, it doesn’t come.

The “struggle” he describes is the writing process.

If someone who’s been writing every day for 15 years still struggles half of the time, then you will too.
But the important thing is that you can learn to grind through it, which brings me to his most important tip:
“If there’s anything I do differently from other people, it’s that when I sit down for that writing period, I don’t get up until I’ve actually written something.

John ships every day for one reason and one reason only.
It’s that he doesn’t allow himself not to.

Think about something you do every day because you won’t allow yourself not to.
Like feeding your children.
That’s what he does with writing.
“Most people who struggle with writing give up way to early.
They sit down.
They struggle.
And they quit.

What if you have nothing to write about?
You find something.
Here’s what I do when I have nothing to write about.

“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

This last piece of advice was really powerful.
Many doubts creep in when you’re first starting out with something, or even after you’ve been doing it for a while.
With writing, the obvious one is “What if I suck?”
I often think I suck at writing.
Especially when I look at someone like Tim Ferriss, who writes ginormous books that millions of people love.
Or James Altucher, who is so transparent with his thoughts and feelings in his writing that people in his own family don’t even talk to him anymore.
Or J.
K.
Rowling who turned her imagination into a billion dollar empire.
These doubts can easily derail your writing habit if you let them.
But just think about that quote.
“It’s not a waste of time to sit and struggle with your art.

Then, keep writing.
ALYG

Writing every day is an INCREDIBLY useful activity and it is definitely worth taking the time to make a habit.
I quickly want to say why it’s so useful, and then I’ll delve into how to actually implement it as a habit in your life.
The main benefits of writing every day are:
(1) Helps you organize your life so that it conforms to your goals.
(2) Gives you an outlet that allows you to express what you’re feeling internally and put it into words rather than just “feeling” it – which gives you a chance to evaluate your own feelings.
(3) Invites self-discipline through struggling to do it everyday.
(4) It’s relaxing.
Now, how do you go actually go about making a habit out of writing every single day?
Altering our habits is really, really difficult.
It takes time, it takes patience, and it takes truly wanting to get something out of it.
Step 1: Why are you making the decision to write every day?
When we don’t know the reasons we want to make positive changes in our lives, we tend to quickly stop taking the positive actions we decided to take.
The WHY, the REASON you want to start writing is the emotional fuel you need to actually stick to doing it consistently.
Taking action on this step – Answer these questions:
Step 2: Choose a time
To effectively add a habit, consistency is crucial.
If you really want to start writing every day, you need to choose a time of day that you’re going to write every single day.
Your mind and body need to adapt in such a way that when the hour you usually write comes around, you’re already prepared for it, you’re looking forward to it.
It isn’t important when you decide, as long as you make a definitive determination about when you know you have the time on most days, and actually stick to it.
BUT, any time you can’t get to writing at the hour you decide, don’t make it an excuse not to do your writing.
You have to have an all or nothing mentality.
You have to make the decision that nothing is going to stop you from doing your habit every day.
Action steps to take:
Step 3: What are you going to write about?
If you don’t know what you’re going to write about – forget about trying to make a habit out of it.
You can’t just decide “I want to start writing” without having at least some idea of what you want to express on paper.
You don’t have to have planned writing topics, but based on the reasons you want to write in the first place (using the questions above), you can come up with a general idea of the kind of things you want to talk to yourself about.
Action steps to take:
Personally, writing serves as a way to keep my work and my life organized.
I have a journal that I write in every single night and morning that helps me plan my days so that I don’t have to think about what it is I’m going to do in the morning adn throughout the day.
I create my routine for every morning, and at night I sit and dwell about what waking up early with a written routine really did for me.
I think about the day I just had and what points of the day I simply wasn’t enjoying.
I think about the best times of the day and what the contrast is between the moments I enjoy in life and the moments I don’t enjoy.
I actually created a journal[1]
Identity: Become the type of person who writes 1,000 words every day.
Small win: Write one paragraph each day this week.
So make it super easy for you.
Anchor a daily writing habit into your existing morning routine.
Do an implementation intention and say:
“After [CURRENT HABIT], I will [BEHAVIOR] at [TIME] in [LOCATION] (or also duration.
)”
For example, after I got my morning coffee I will sit down on my desk and write in my word file for 15 mins or until I have one paragraph.

Make it easy and visible for you so you can stick to it.
Over time you will build up momentum and can increase the amount you write.
This will change your identity.
You will become a person who writes every day.
Hope that helps,
Kilian
Want to take charge of your habits?
Join my “Habit Mastermind” group for entrepreneurs & busy professionals here.

If these ideas resonate with you, let me know your thoughts in a quick comment below.
I’d love to connect with you!

I used to be afraid of writing.
I would agonize over every word, rewriting my sentences over and over, and repeatedly rearranging my ideas.
I hated writing.
I hated writing because there was no right answer, and I felt like no matter how I said something, there was a better way.
But I couldn’t figure out what that better way was.
In AP English my senior year of high school, I never turned a single paper in on time.
During my portfolio review at the end of the year, my teacher expressed grave concern.
How would I make it through college if I couldn’t get my papers in on time? Easy.
I’d study engineering.
I had it all figured out for a while because studying engineering meant I didn’t have to write much.
When I did have to write, it was mostly just labs.
Those were easy.
Also, in Technical Writing, I got an A+.
That was relatively painless because our professor gave us so much structure.
But when it comes to writing that matters, writing meant to communicate, writing meant to be creative, I really struggled.
I even struggled with emails.
It’s hard to figure out how to say things.
But, you know, maybe I was trying too hard.
Ever since I got an iPhone, I’ve been writing a lot.
It hasn’t been how you think.
For the longest time, I didn’t even realize what I was doing.
I was just texting.
But because the iPhone keypad enabled me to text so quickly and efficiently, I started texting a lot.
For the longest time, I thought my overly verbose texting was a problem.
And maybe it is.
People have found it annoying.
But ultimately it has been a form of writing practice.
It has been a way to write without worrying so much about saying things perfectly.
Often I just text stream of consciousness.
Then one day I realized I could simply write the way I text.
Maybe my writing isn’t perfect.
But it is easy.
And I’m certainly very prolific.
If you can text every day, you certainly can write every day.
Well, actually if you are texting, you already are writing every day, but it sounds like you want to be generating higher volume.
So every time you have a thought or idea, just type it into your phone.

Here is a cool technique to start writing daily.
If you’re writing a novel or working on a long term literary project.
Often comes the day when you do not feel like writing at all and it happens (Don’t worry).
On such days try writing something else; but WRITE!
Write a tiny tale/conversation/poem around any thought that pops up in your mind.
It could even be any funny/inspiring/worth-sharing incidents from your past.
(Keep it short.
Pour your imagination.
Let your creative heart perform the pirouette.
)
Soon you might as well have a nice collection of poetry/short stories.
Cherish your work.
Join yourquote or you can even make an instagram page.
It will keep your writing alive and so the interest inside you.
I do it daily apart from writing my novel.
It’s refreshing and gives you an absolute sense as a writer.
Here is one piece of conversation from my collection

Developing a habit is as simple as incorporating it into your day.
Write a lot.
Write EVERY SINGLE DAY, even if it is only for 15 minutes.
Get in the HABIT of sitting down at the computer and turning off your phone and writing.
Write different things.
For Improving:
Get critiqued.
One way is to go somewhere like Reddit, which has a whole sub for writing prompts (r/writingprompts) and get tons of different prompts and styles.
Try writing in different styles and from different perspectives.
For example, write a short story however you want and then come back and write the SAME story but from a different character’s perspective.
Or write a story in third person and come back and write the same story in first person.
What do they not know that the narrator knew? How does knowing her thoughts change what the reader knows about her motivations?
Another similar exercise is to rewrite a story you read somewhere (an existing story, and just for practice) from the perspective of a non-main character.

What I have read about writers over and over again, is that they have very strict writing schedules.
It is easy to get distracted, but serious, successful writers keep at it every day.
I have consistantly read that it is important to write every single day at the same time and place set aside just for writing.
Writers have said they may not have anything specific to write about, a project they are working on, but they write anyway.
It keeps their mind open, exercised, and ready for writing.
It can keep writer's block at bay; the kiss of death for a writer.
Some writers who have families and jobs get up very early every morning and write before anyone else is up, before work.
Some writers have to wait until after their regular job.
They write at night for a few hours after everyone has gone to bed.
More successful, established writers who write for a living, set working hours just like an office or regular job.
They get up in the morning, get dressed in working clothes, have breakfast, then go to work at home.
It could be an extra room set aside as an office.
It could be a place away from home where they work at their writing job.
Some lucky writers have little rooms built in their backyard as their writing studio.
Whatever, wherever a writer has set aside for work, a quiet place they can concentrate, it is as important as any “regular" workplace area.
Beginning, new writers read books that successful writers have written about their writing life.
It is helpful when you are getting started.
But the most important part of writing, is actually writing.
Perseverance, discipline, dedication, is the key to successful writing.
Just do it!

Hi! While I know neither your personal schedule or what kind of writing you are interested in, here are a few simple tips I followed while writing my first two novels.
After a certain time, routine takes over.
The best of luck,
Bella

Updated: 25.06.2019 — 7:36 pm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *