From which books you have learned most

From which books you have learned most?


Hi,
Although I am not an avid reader, I occasionally read books, but only those that seem to concentrate on topics that interest me, and so I would say that the answer is the Steve Jobs biography by Karen Bluemental.

Here’s why.
Firstly it’s about a well know person, someone everyone aspires to be, however unlike other biographies whereby there is a lot of concentration on early life, this biography looks very critically at the time he spent thinking about a company called Apple, and then further shows how he brings his dreams to life one step at a time.

It is also quite emotional and shows that life is not easy, especially when he was kicked out of his son company.

But instead of just concentrating on the fact that Steve was a genius the book tries to look at the thought process that made him tick, something not all books have, and that’s what I found most intriguing about it.

Anyone can go ahead and read about his life simply online, however this biography is like a window into his mind, somethnig truly unique, motivational and outstanding to be brutally honest.

There are several lessons to be learnt throughout he book, and I strongly recommend it.

I hope this helped you.


The Golden Bough.
I mean…dear god, I can’t even begin explaining how much that book changed my life.

Without exaggeration, it’s literally a full-blown primer on the roots of all human habits, customs, and behaviors.
There’s more information in five pages than most complete books contain.
No joke.

It’ll take you a long time to read it, but I really suggest you do.
Take it slow…it’s a lot to absorb all at once.
It also cross-references quite often, so get some page tabs and use them.
You’ll thank me later.

It’s the life work of Professor James Frazer.
This guy was amazing.
Wow.
I’ve no clue how this guy managed to compile all this information, but…god damn.
This thing is a true masterpiece.
I’ve never viewed life the same way after reading this tome…and I’d never want to go back.

PS – it isn’t a novel, but an extremely detailed and intimate study of a wide variety of human cultures from an anthropological perspective.
It’s truly the most incredible piece of written work I’ve ever encountered.
Nothing else even comes close.


How science works, good ethics, the myths of gender and of race, and the harm of capitalism, how to read news and statistics critically, and the difference between valid and invalid opinions all feature.

The books which are true and near universally relevant.

These books are ones everyone should read if they want to fight post truth or dishonest news and pretend knowledge which gives rise to crimes.

How to discern valid statistics and valid science
A Candle In the Dark by Carl Sagan
How to discern science from pseudoscience and the value of rationality.

Most claims about gender, boys, girls and other linked to inevitable nature are wrong.
This is why.

The media makes us obey and follows the status quo.

Literature is valuable
Most people uphold objectivity with no idea what it is: this answers what objectivity means in taste, ethics, science, numbers and history.

Economics is political-economy that disguises itself as science and nature; this guide explains how political-economy works
How government, and vested interests, works in Britain.
Incidentally, how Brexit was allowed to happen because of mere precedent
University degrees and time spent on inessentials rather than STEM degrees or raising bank accounts are shamed: this is stupid, and this is why.

The subjectivity of ‘that’s your opinion and I’ve got one too’ is refuted here by the rule of probable and improbable opinions, the difference between coherence and faulty logic.

How do material objects like coins and notes and digits get almost spiritual value that is exchangeable–and why?
Success is down to the environment: the idea of self made person is a complete myth and pernicious individualism.

How newer generations are less literate, critical, progressive than they’d like to believe.
Ultimately how much of our knowledge is really infotainment dumbed-down beyond recognition.

Ethics is to a degree, nature afterall.

What is good and how can we make more of it.

What is justice? What makes a ‘good’ country is fairness for its citizens and fairness can be judged objectively through the veil of ignorance.

Bad politicans succeed because bad politicians are rewarded in the system.
That politicians be good people to win is a myth.
If Americans had read Machiavelli or had a culture where that was a norm who would win the presidency?
Race is an unscientific idea that is still implicitly believed–this ventures how this happens and how rational explanations can mitigate.

If only they were made compulsory in the UK, but for that the education secretary would have to read and believe them.

I'm no more a booklover than a people lover; it's what's inside the most special ones that counts.

This is sourced from an anti-post truth piece Post Truth Reading


Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Nineties by Paul Johnson
The classic world history of the events, ideas, and personalities of the twentieth century.

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
In Bryson's biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves.
Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us.
To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps.
He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds.
A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.
Science has never been more involving or entertaining.

The Gulag Archipelago Abridged: An Experiment in Literary Investigation by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Herewith the unchallenged epic of our era.
A towering masterpiece of world literature, the searing record of four decades of terror and oppression, distilled into one abridged volume (authorized by the author).

Drawing on his own experiences before, during and after his eleven years of incarceration and exile, on evidence provided by more than 200 fellow prisoners, and on Soviet archives, Solzhenitsyn reveals with torrential narrative and dramatic power the entire apparatus of Soviet repression, the state within the state that once ruled all-powerfully with its creation by Lenin in 1918.
Through truly Shakespearean portraits of its victims-this man, that woman, that child-we encounter the secret police operations, the labor camps and prisons, the uprooting or extermination of whole populations, the “welcome” that awaited Russian soldiers who had been German prisoners of war.
Yet we also witness astounding moral courage, the incorruptibility with which the occasional individual or a few scattered groups, all defenseless, endured brutality and degradation.
And Solzhenitsyn’s genius has transmuted this grisly indictment into a literary miracle.

The Discovery Of The Unconscious by Henri F.
Ellenberger
This classic work is a monumental, integrated view of man's search for an understanding of the inner reaches of the mind.
In an account that is both exhaustive and exciting, the distinguished psychiatrist and author demonstrates the long chain of development,through the exorcists, magnetists, and hypnotists,that led to the fruition of dynamic psychiatry in the psychological systems of Janet, Freud, Adler, and Jung.

Antony Beevor
Malcolm Gladwell
The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire.
Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a small but precisely targeted push cause a fashion trend, the popularity of a new product, or a drop in the crime rate.
This widely acclaimed bestseller, in which Malcolm Gladwell explores and brilliantly illuminates the tipping point phenomenon, is already changing the way people throughout the world think about selling products and disseminating ideas.

Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem.
Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?
In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"–the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful.
He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different?
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea by Barbara Demick
Demick brings to life what it means to be living under the most repressive regime today—an Orwellian world that is by choice not connected to the Internet, where displays of affection are punished, informants are rewarded, and an offhand remark can send a person to the gulag for life.
She takes us deep inside the country, beyond the reach of government censors, and through meticulous and sensitive reporting we see her subjects fall in love, raise families, nurture ambitions, and struggle for survival.
One by one, we witness their profound, life-altering disillusionment with the government and their realization that, rather than providing them with lives of abundance, their country has betrayed them.

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt
As America descends deeper into polarization and paralysis, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt has done the seemingly impossible—challenged conventional thinking about morality, politics, and religion in a way that speaks to everyone on the political spectrum.
Drawing on his twenty five years of groundbreaking research on moral psychology, he shows how moral judgments arise not from reason but from gut feelings.
He shows why liberals, conservatives, and libertarians have such different intuitions about right and wrong, and he shows why each side is actually right about many of its central concerns.
In this subtle yet accessible book, Haidt gives you the key to understanding the miracle of human cooperation, as well as the curse of our eternal divisions and conflicts.
If you’re ready to trade in anger for understanding, read The Righteous Mind.

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
A black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: It is unpredictable; it carries a massive impact; and, after the fact, we concoct an explanation that makes it appear less random, and more predictable, than it was.

The astonishing success of Google was a black swan; so was 9/11.
For Nassim Nicholas Taleb, black swans underlie almost everything about our world, from the rise of religions to events in our own personal lives.

Why do we not acknowledge the phenomenon of black swans until after they occur? Part of the answer, according to Taleb, is that humans are hardwired to learn specifics when they should be focused on generalities.

We concentrate on things we already know and time and time again fail to take into consideration what we don’t know.
We are, therefore, unable to truly estimate opportunities, too vulnerable to the impulse to simplify, narrate, and categorize, and not open enough to rewarding those who can imagine the “impossible.

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
From the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost philosophers of our time, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a book on how some systems actually benefit from disorder.

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem; in Antifragility he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events.
For what he calls the "antifragile" is one step beyond robust, as it benefits from adversity, uncertainty and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension.

Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, and proposing that things be built in an antifragile manner.
Extremely ambitious and multidisciplinary, Antifragility provides a blueprint for how to behave-and thrive-in a world we don't understand and which is too uncertain for us to even try to understand.
He who is not antifragile will perish.
Why is the city state better than the nation state, why is debt bad for you, and why is almost everything modern bound to fail? The book covers innovation, health, biology, medicine, life decisions, politics, foreign policy, urban planning, war, personal finance, and economic systems.
Throughout, the voice and recipes of the ancient wisdom from Phoenician, Roman, Greek, and Medieval sources are heard loud and clear.

Man and His Symbols by Carl G.
Jung
Illustrated throughout with revealing images, this is the first and only work in which the world-famous Swiss psychologist explains to the layperson his enormously influential theory of symbolism as revealed in dreams.

1984 by George Orwell
In 1984, London is a grim city in the totalitarian state of Oceania where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind.
Winston Smith is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions.
Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party.
Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be.

Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell
In 1936, originally intending merely to report on the Spanish Civil War as a journalist, George Orwell found himself embroiled as a participant—as a member of the Workers’ Party of Marxist Unity.
Fighting against the Fascists, he described in painfully vivid and occasionally comic detail life in the trenches—with a “democratic army” composed of men with no ranks, no titles, and often no weapons—and his near fatal wounding.
As the politics became tangled, Orwell was pulled into a heartbreaking conflict between his own personal ideals and the complicated realities of political power struggles.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Now more than ever: Aldous Huxley's enduring "masterpiece .
.
.
one of the most prophetic dystopian works of the 20th century" (
Wall Street Journal) must be read and understood by anyone concerned with preserving the human spirit in the face of our "brave new world"
Aldous Huxley's profoundly important classic of world literature, Brave New World is a searching vision of an unequal, technologically-advanced future where humans are genetically bred, socially indoctrinated, and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively uphold an authoritarian ruling order–all at the cost of our freedom, full humanity, and perhaps also our souls.
“A genius [who] who spent his life decrying the onward march of the Machine” (The New Yorker), Huxley was a man of incomparable talents: equally an artist, a spiritual seeker, and one of history’s keenest observers of human nature and civilization.
Brave New World, his masterpiece, has enthralled and terrified millions of readers, and retains its urgent relevance to this day as both a warning to be heeded as we head into tomorrow and as thought-provoking, satisfying work of literature.
Written in the shadow of the rise of fascism during the 1930s, Brave New World likewise speaks to a 21st-century world dominated by mass-entertainment, technology, medicine and pharmaceuticals, the arts of persuasion, and the hidden influence of elites.

Thomas Sowell


I always loved to read, and wrote from a young age.
But the book from which I gained the most knowledge was Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’.
This novel was assigned reading for my a-level English literature course when I was 17 years old, and though I'd always had a passion for reading as entertainment this book showed me how much more literature could be.

This novel is a near future dystopia, set in a religious military dictatorship in what was formerly the USA.

The reason I gained so much knowledge from this novel is due to is deep political and theocratic themes, it challenged the world and questioned things which I saw in my own reality.

I went on to study this novel in depth and write my masters thesis on it, within a single day of research and reading for my paper I had covered the following topics:
This single novel inspired me to read on all of these topics based on themes found within it and related issues.
This also led me to seek out other novels which questioned the world in which we lived, and these in turn led me on similar quests for knowledge as above.
So thanks to Atwood’s brilliant novel I was inspired to begin seeking knowledge, and I continue to do so thanks to it.
It is, and will remain one of my favourite works of literature.


As I've already answered, it's “One True Thing” by Ann Quindlen.
Ironically, it's an American book, not Russian, from which I am most likely supposed to learn.
Still, I've learned a lot from it; many things, really.
I've learned that as a wife and a woman I shouldn't invest everything I have in the family.
The protagonist did so and ended up fighting cancer with her husband staying aside watching her do it and planning her funeral.
I found out that we are much alike in many respects: I am as good at cooking and arranging things in the house as she was.
Not so good at sewing, embroidering and stenciling though:-).
But there is one major difference between us: she was a stay- at- home mom while I have always been working even when I was on my maternity leaves with both sons ( it's long in Russia.
Up to three years) and whereas she invested her energy, her love and her talents in her home and family, I did this+ invested my money.
Just like her I did my best to be the perfect wife.
Just like her, I wasn't rewarded for that.
Still, she had financial support from her unfaithful husband while I had to fight all alone.

So, what is the lesson that I've learned from this nice book? Invest in yourself.
You can only rely on yourself in this life.
Don't be too devoted to your husband, don't assume that he loves you the way you love him, because he doesn't.
The protagonist was too loving, too forgiving and too soft.
She died.
I started doing everything the other way round.
I survived.


Shrimad Bhagavat Geetha in original Sanskrit text with translation of your choice along with Mahabharata to understand its background and the Upanishads to properly understand its teachings.

You must follow its teachings to the word; that is why thorough understanding with reference to the context is necessary.

It took me more than two years to complete.

Afterwards I thoroughly and critically read the English translations of Holy Bible and Holy Quran.
I had to be satisfied with the translations only as I do not know Arabic or Latin.

It took me another two years to understand the origin of the concept of the day of judgement and the resultant eternal torment in fiery hell.

I had to refer often to the English translations of Antiquity of the Jews by Josephus, Hadith and Sharia.

Please do not ask me how it changed my life because I shall not tell you about my grades in the school and my first job.

I feel every young man should read the three books in the order and manner stated.
It is also worthwhile to read, at least in translation, Tripitaka, Jain Agama, Zend Avesta and the teachings of Confucius.

N.
B.
Earlier I had read translations of Geetha, stories from Mahabharata, Upanishads etc.
None of them is anywhere close to the original.


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These are the books from which I learned the most.

Note: If you are willing to read UNPOSTED LETTER, do not read the pirated version of book in pdf even if you find it.
It has a different feeling when you literally read it in your hands.


All books contain value.
Nonfiction books aren't necessarily "better" because they contain facts.
The author can still be poorly researched or misleading and provide little value.
Likewise fiction books can have an uninspired story and provide little value.
I would say that a good book of any type contains value.
A great nonfiction book can teach the reader about a new part of the world or of history, or teach the reader to think differently or act differently.
A great fiction book may have a gripping story and fascinating characters that takes the reader on a creative journey and let's their mind wander and become immersed in the author's imagination.

There is great evidence to support the notion that reading, any reading, improve creativity, critical thinking, and communication abilities.
So whatever you do, read!


Bomb by David Sheinkin
This book follows not only the scientists and discoveries that lead to the atomic bomb, but the spies recruited by the KGB to steal the plans for the bomb and other expeditions to sabotage the German bomb.
If you are interested by WWII you will definitely find this book interesting.
It is laid out in a way that younger people could easily read it as well.


Mind is a Myth – UG (here) Mind is a Myth /Introduction
Essential UG– Copyright Notice
Good luck!


How to Win Friends and Influence People


'The Outsiders' by S.
E.
Hinton
Life lesson: Stay gold.

“Stay gold, Ponyboy.
” S.
E.
Hinton’s The Outsiders is all about retaining your goodness when the world tries to beat and cheat it out of you.
Remember it when you’re feeling nasty toward the world.

'Anne of Green Gables' by L.
M.
Montgomery
Life lesson: Define yourself.

In Anne of Green Gables, L.
M.
Montgomery’s spunky heroine never let anyone misunderstand her.
I’ve written about the life lessons found in Anne of Green Gables before, but it’s never the wrong time for a refresher read.


Just an Ordinary Spaceman by Clayton Anderson.

It was the first time that someone goes in depth when describing every adventure he had from the first baby steps that Mr.
Anderson took to join NASA, until the very end of his career as an astronaut.

Whatever your interest in space may be, the author takes us there into a long journey to fulfill that interest and learn more about it.

Some of the things that amuse me are:
His training underwater off the coast of Florida.

His living quarters in the ISS.

His first time returning to Earth after a while in space.

The loneliness of being 200,000 miles away from civilization.

Anything else… pick a copy of it.


Personally I’d say A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.
Though yes it’s aimed at a slightly younger audience, the story is moving and deals with the move from childhood to adulthood very well, through the breaking on ones innocence.
(Also 10/10 you will cry if you have any remenant of a heart)


The Power of subconscious Mind By Joeshep Murphy
Buy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind Book Online at Low Prices in India


THE UNPOSTED LETTER – BY MAHATRIA
It's an amazing and thought provoking book.

Every page you open, you'll get an answer to the various questions of life.

It truly was life transforming for me and for each and everyone I've met who has read this book.

On birthdays of my friends and family I buy this book and give it as a gift to each and every one, whom I want to excel and have ABUNDANCE in their lives.

I hope you will find your answers too.
.
.
.
.
You can also follow him and his life transforming sessions at INFINITHEISM.
com


Richard Byrds’ Alone.
It’s an old book,by the man who was an antarctic explorer early in the last century.
By then,of course,Admunssen had reached the South Pole,s had poor Scott.
Byrds expedition was a scientific one.
He decided that while his colleagues studied conditions in a different spot,he would do so elsewhere,alone.
He wanted to think.
He spent months in isoltion,only speaking to his friends in the evening by radio.
After a few months he began to feel ill.
Unknown to him there had been a buildup of carbon monoxide from his stove.
He knew that any attempt to rescue him would endanger his friends so he denied anything was wrong.
In the lowest depths ,totallly isolated from everyone and everything he evaluates the meaning of life.
A very powerful book .
Probably out of print .
A pity,because it deserves to be better known.


From which books you have learned most?


Hi,
Although I am not an avid reader, I occasionally read books, but only those that seem to concentrate on topics that interest me, and so I would say that the answer is the Steve Jobs biography by Karen Bluemental.

Here’s why.
Firstly it’s about a well know person, someone everyone aspires to be, however unlike other biographies whereby there is a lot of concentration on early life, this biography looks very critically at the time he spent thinking about a company called Apple, and then further shows how he brings his dreams to life one step at a time.

It is also quite emotional and shows that life is not easy, especially when he was kicked out of his son company.

But instead of just concentrating on the fact that Steve was a genius the book tries to look at the thought process that made him tick, something not all books have, and that’s what I found most intriguing about it.

Anyone can go ahead and read about his life simply online, however this biography is like a window into his mind, somethnig truly unique, motivational and outstanding to be brutally honest.

There are several lessons to be learnt throughout he book, and I strongly recommend it.

I hope this helped you.


The Golden Bough.
I mean…dear god, I can’t even begin explaining how much that book changed my life.

Without exaggeration, it’s literally a full-blown primer on the roots of all human habits, customs, and behaviors.
There’s more information in five pages than most complete books contain.
No joke.

It’ll take you a long time to read it, but I really suggest you do.
Take it slow…it’s a lot to absorb all at once.
It also cross-references quite often, so get some page tabs and use them.
You’ll thank me later.

It’s the life work of Professor James Frazer.
This guy was amazing.
Wow.
I’ve no clue how this guy managed to compile all this information, but…god damn.
This thing is a true masterpiece.
I’ve never viewed life the same way after reading this tome…and I’d never want to go back.

PS – it isn’t a novel, but an extremely detailed and intimate study of a wide variety of human cultures from an anthropological perspective.
It’s truly the most incredible piece of written work I’ve ever encountered.
Nothing else even comes close.


How science works, good ethics, the myths of gender and of race, and the harm of capitalism, how to read news and statistics critically, and the difference between valid and invalid opinions all feature.

The books which are true and near universally relevant.

These books are ones everyone should read if they want to fight post truth or dishonest news and pretend knowledge which gives rise to crimes.

How to discern valid statistics and valid science
A Candle In the Dark by Carl Sagan
How to discern science from pseudoscience and the value of rationality.

Most claims about gender, boys, girls and other linked to inevitable nature are wrong.
This is why.

The media makes us obey and follows the status quo.

Literature is valuable
Most people uphold objectivity with no idea what it is: this answers what objectivity means in taste, ethics, science, numbers and history.

Economics is political-economy that disguises itself as science and nature; this guide explains how political-economy works
How government, and vested interests, works in Britain.
Incidentally, how Brexit was allowed to happen because of mere precedent
University degrees and time spent on inessentials rather than STEM degrees or raising bank accounts are shamed: this is stupid, and this is why.

The subjectivity of ‘that’s your opinion and I’ve got one too’ is refuted here by the rule of probable and improbable opinions, the difference between coherence and faulty logic.

How do material objects like coins and notes and digits get almost spiritual value that is exchangeable–and why?
Success is down to the environment: the idea of self made person is a complete myth and pernicious individualism.

How newer generations are less literate, critical, progressive than they’d like to believe.
Ultimately how much of our knowledge is really infotainment dumbed-down beyond recognition.

Ethics is to a degree, nature afterall.

What is good and how can we make more of it.

What is justice? What makes a ‘good’ country is fairness for its citizens and fairness can be judged objectively through the veil of ignorance.

Bad politicans succeed because bad politicians are rewarded in the system.
That politicians be good people to win is a myth.
If Americans had read Machiavelli or had a culture where that was a norm who would win the presidency?
Race is an unscientific idea that is still implicitly believed–this ventures how this happens and how rational explanations can mitigate.

If only they were made compulsory in the UK, but for that the education secretary would have to read and believe them.

I'm no more a booklover than a people lover; it's what's inside the most special ones that counts.

This is sourced from an anti-post truth piece Post Truth Reading


Modern Times: The World from the Twenties to the Nineties by Paul Johnson
The classic world history of the events, ideas, and personalities of the twentieth century.

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
In Bryson's biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves.
Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us.
To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps.
He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds.
A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.
Science has never been more involving or entertaining.

The Gulag Archipelago Abridged: An Experiment in Literary Investigation by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Herewith the unchallenged epic of our era.
A towering masterpiece of world literature, the searing record of four decades of terror and oppression, distilled into one abridged volume (authorized by the author).

Drawing on his own experiences before, during and after his eleven years of incarceration and exile, on evidence provided by more than 200 fellow prisoners, and on Soviet archives, Solzhenitsyn reveals with torrential narrative and dramatic power the entire apparatus of Soviet repression, the state within the state that once ruled all-powerfully with its creation by Lenin in 1918.
Through truly Shakespearean portraits of its victims-this man, that woman, that child-we encounter the secret police operations, the labor camps and prisons, the uprooting or extermination of whole populations, the “welcome” that awaited Russian soldiers who had been German prisoners of war.
Yet we also witness astounding moral courage, the incorruptibility with which the occasional individual or a few scattered groups, all defenseless, endured brutality and degradation.
And Solzhenitsyn’s genius has transmuted this grisly indictment into a literary miracle.

The Discovery Of The Unconscious by Henri F.
Ellenberger
This classic work is a monumental, integrated view of man's search for an understanding of the inner reaches of the mind.
In an account that is both exhaustive and exciting, the distinguished psychiatrist and author demonstrates the long chain of development,through the exorcists, magnetists, and hypnotists,that led to the fruition of dynamic psychiatry in the psychological systems of Janet, Freud, Adler, and Jung.

Antony Beevor
Malcolm Gladwell
The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire.
Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a small but precisely targeted push cause a fashion trend, the popularity of a new product, or a drop in the crime rate.
This widely acclaimed bestseller, in which Malcolm Gladwell explores and brilliantly illuminates the tipping point phenomenon, is already changing the way people throughout the world think about selling products and disseminating ideas.

Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem.
Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?
In this stunning new book, Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual journey through the world of "outliers"–the best and the brightest, the most famous and the most successful.
He asks the question: what makes high-achievers different?
Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea by Barbara Demick
Demick brings to life what it means to be living under the most repressive regime today—an Orwellian world that is by choice not connected to the Internet, where displays of affection are punished, informants are rewarded, and an offhand remark can send a person to the gulag for life.
She takes us deep inside the country, beyond the reach of government censors, and through meticulous and sensitive reporting we see her subjects fall in love, raise families, nurture ambitions, and struggle for survival.
One by one, we witness their profound, life-altering disillusionment with the government and their realization that, rather than providing them with lives of abundance, their country has betrayed them.

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People Are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt
As America descends deeper into polarization and paralysis, social psychologist Jonathan Haidt has done the seemingly impossible—challenged conventional thinking about morality, politics, and religion in a way that speaks to everyone on the political spectrum.
Drawing on his twenty five years of groundbreaking research on moral psychology, he shows how moral judgments arise not from reason but from gut feelings.
He shows why liberals, conservatives, and libertarians have such different intuitions about right and wrong, and he shows why each side is actually right about many of its central concerns.
In this subtle yet accessible book, Haidt gives you the key to understanding the miracle of human cooperation, as well as the curse of our eternal divisions and conflicts.
If you’re ready to trade in anger for understanding, read The Righteous Mind.

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
A black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: It is unpredictable; it carries a massive impact; and, after the fact, we concoct an explanation that makes it appear less random, and more predictable, than it was.

The astonishing success of Google was a black swan; so was 9/11.
For Nassim Nicholas Taleb, black swans underlie almost everything about our world, from the rise of religions to events in our own personal lives.

Why do we not acknowledge the phenomenon of black swans until after they occur? Part of the answer, according to Taleb, is that humans are hardwired to learn specifics when they should be focused on generalities.

We concentrate on things we already know and time and time again fail to take into consideration what we don’t know.
We are, therefore, unable to truly estimate opportunities, too vulnerable to the impulse to simplify, narrate, and categorize, and not open enough to rewarding those who can imagine the “impossible.

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb
From the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost philosophers of our time, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, a book on how some systems actually benefit from disorder.

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem; in Antifragility he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events.
For what he calls the "antifragile" is one step beyond robust, as it benefits from adversity, uncertainty and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension.

Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, and proposing that things be built in an antifragile manner.
Extremely ambitious and multidisciplinary, Antifragility provides a blueprint for how to behave-and thrive-in a world we don't understand and which is too uncertain for us to even try to understand.
He who is not antifragile will perish.
Why is the city state better than the nation state, why is debt bad for you, and why is almost everything modern bound to fail? The book covers innovation, health, biology, medicine, life decisions, politics, foreign policy, urban planning, war, personal finance, and economic systems.
Throughout, the voice and recipes of the ancient wisdom from Phoenician, Roman, Greek, and Medieval sources are heard loud and clear.

Man and His Symbols by Carl G.
Jung
Illustrated throughout with revealing images, this is the first and only work in which the world-famous Swiss psychologist explains to the layperson his enormously influential theory of symbolism as revealed in dreams.

1984 by George Orwell
In 1984, London is a grim city in the totalitarian state of Oceania where Big Brother is always watching you and the Thought Police can practically read your mind.
Winston Smith is a man in grave danger for the simple reason that his memory still functions.
Drawn into a forbidden love affair, Winston finds the courage to join a secret revolutionary organization called The Brotherhood, dedicated to the destruction of the Party.
Together with his beloved Julia, he hazards his life in a deadly match against the powers that be.

Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell
In 1936, originally intending merely to report on the Spanish Civil War as a journalist, George Orwell found himself embroiled as a participant—as a member of the Workers’ Party of Marxist Unity.
Fighting against the Fascists, he described in painfully vivid and occasionally comic detail life in the trenches—with a “democratic army” composed of men with no ranks, no titles, and often no weapons—and his near fatal wounding.
As the politics became tangled, Orwell was pulled into a heartbreaking conflict between his own personal ideals and the complicated realities of political power struggles.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
Now more than ever: Aldous Huxley's enduring "masterpiece .
.
.
one of the most prophetic dystopian works of the 20th century" (
Wall Street Journal) must be read and understood by anyone concerned with preserving the human spirit in the face of our "brave new world"
Aldous Huxley's profoundly important classic of world literature, Brave New World is a searching vision of an unequal, technologically-advanced future where humans are genetically bred, socially indoctrinated, and pharmaceutically anesthetized to passively uphold an authoritarian ruling order–all at the cost of our freedom, full humanity, and perhaps also our souls.
“A genius [who] who spent his life decrying the onward march of the Machine” (The New Yorker), Huxley was a man of incomparable talents: equally an artist, a spiritual seeker, and one of history’s keenest observers of human nature and civilization.
Brave New World, his masterpiece, has enthralled and terrified millions of readers, and retains its urgent relevance to this day as both a warning to be heeded as we head into tomorrow and as thought-provoking, satisfying work of literature.
Written in the shadow of the rise of fascism during the 1930s, Brave New World likewise speaks to a 21st-century world dominated by mass-entertainment, technology, medicine and pharmaceuticals, the arts of persuasion, and the hidden influence of elites.

Thomas Sowell


I always loved to read, and wrote from a young age.
But the book from which I gained the most knowledge was Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’.
This novel was assigned reading for my a-level English literature course when I was 17 years old, and though I'd always had a passion for reading as entertainment this book showed me how much more literature could be.

This novel is a near future dystopia, set in a religious military dictatorship in what was formerly the USA.

The reason I gained so much knowledge from this novel is due to is deep political and theocratic themes, it challenged the world and questioned things which I saw in my own reality.

I went on to study this novel in depth and write my masters thesis on it, within a single day of research and reading for my paper I had covered the following topics:
This single novel inspired me to read on all of these topics based on themes found within it and related issues.
This also led me to seek out other novels which questioned the world in which we lived, and these in turn led me on similar quests for knowledge as above.
So thanks to Atwood’s brilliant novel I was inspired to begin seeking knowledge, and I continue to do so thanks to it.
It is, and will remain one of my favourite works of literature.


As I've already answered, it's “One True Thing” by Ann Quindlen.
Ironically, it's an American book, not Russian, from which I am most likely supposed to learn.
Still, I've learned a lot from it; many things, really.
I've learned that as a wife and a woman I shouldn't invest everything I have in the family.
The protagonist did so and ended up fighting cancer with her husband staying aside watching her do it and planning her funeral.
I found out that we are much alike in many respects: I am as good at cooking and arranging things in the house as she was.
Not so good at sewing, embroidering and stenciling though:-).
But there is one major difference between us: she was a stay- at- home mom while I have always been working even when I was on my maternity leaves with both sons ( it's long in Russia.
Up to three years) and whereas she invested her energy, her love and her talents in her home and family, I did this+ invested my money.
Just like her I did my best to be the perfect wife.
Just like her, I wasn't rewarded for that.
Still, she had financial support from her unfaithful husband while I had to fight all alone.

So, what is the lesson that I've learned from this nice book? Invest in yourself.
You can only rely on yourself in this life.
Don't be too devoted to your husband, don't assume that he loves you the way you love him, because he doesn't.
The protagonist was too loving, too forgiving and too soft.
She died.
I started doing everything the other way round.
I survived.


Shrimad Bhagavat Geetha in original Sanskrit text with translation of your choice along with Mahabharata to understand its background and the Upanishads to properly understand its teachings.

You must follow its teachings to the word; that is why thorough understanding with reference to the context is necessary.

It took me more than two years to complete.

Afterwards I thoroughly and critically read the English translations of Holy Bible and Holy Quran.
I had to be satisfied with the translations only as I do not know Arabic or Latin.

It took me another two years to understand the origin of the concept of the day of judgement and the resultant eternal torment in fiery hell.

I had to refer often to the English translations of Antiquity of the Jews by Josephus, Hadith and Sharia.

Please do not ask me how it changed my life because I shall not tell you about my grades in the school and my first job.

I feel every young man should read the three books in the order and manner stated.
It is also worthwhile to read, at least in translation, Tripitaka, Jain Agama, Zend Avesta and the teachings of Confucius.

N.
B.
Earlier I had read translations of Geetha, stories from Mahabharata, Upanishads etc.
None of them is anywhere close to the original.


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These are the books from which I learned the most.

Note: If you are willing to read UNPOSTED LETTER, do not read the pirated version of book in pdf even if you find it.
It has a different feeling when you literally read it in your hands.


All books contain value.
Nonfiction books aren't necessarily "better" because they contain facts.
The author can still be poorly researched or misleading and provide little value.
Likewise fiction books can have an uninspired story and provide little value.
I would say that a good book of any type contains value.
A great nonfiction book can teach the reader about a new part of the world or of history, or teach the reader to think differently or act differently.
A great fiction book may have a gripping story and fascinating characters that takes the reader on a creative journey and let's their mind wander and become immersed in the author's imagination.

There is great evidence to support the notion that reading, any reading, improve creativity, critical thinking, and communication abilities.
So whatever you do, read!


Bomb by David Sheinkin
This book follows not only the scientists and discoveries that lead to the atomic bomb, but the spies recruited by the KGB to steal the plans for the bomb and other expeditions to sabotage the German bomb.
If you are interested by WWII you will definitely find this book interesting.
It is laid out in a way that younger people could easily read it as well.


Mind is a Myth – UG (here) Mind is a Myth /Introduction
Essential UG– Copyright Notice
Good luck!


How to Win Friends and Influence People


'The Outsiders' by S.
E.
Hinton
Life lesson: Stay gold.

“Stay gold, Ponyboy.
” S.
E.
Hinton’s The Outsiders is all about retaining your goodness when the world tries to beat and cheat it out of you.
Remember it when you’re feeling nasty toward the world.

'Anne of Green Gables' by L.
M.
Montgomery
Life lesson: Define yourself.

In Anne of Green Gables, L.
M.
Montgomery’s spunky heroine never let anyone misunderstand her.
I’ve written about the life lessons found in Anne of Green Gables before, but it’s never the wrong time for a refresher read.


Just an Ordinary Spaceman by Clayton Anderson.

It was the first time that someone goes in depth when describing every adventure he had from the first baby steps that Mr.
Anderson took to join NASA, until the very end of his career as an astronaut.

Whatever your interest in space may be, the author takes us there into a long journey to fulfill that interest and learn more about it.

Some of the things that amuse me are:
His training underwater off the coast of Florida.

His living quarters in the ISS.

His first time returning to Earth after a while in space.

The loneliness of being 200,000 miles away from civilization.

Anything else… pick a copy of it.


Personally I’d say A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.
Though yes it’s aimed at a slightly younger audience, the story is moving and deals with the move from childhood to adulthood very well, through the breaking on ones innocence.
(Also 10/10 you will cry if you have any remenant of a heart)


The Power of subconscious Mind By Joeshep Murphy
Buy The Power of Your Subconscious Mind Book Online at Low Prices in India


THE UNPOSTED LETTER – BY MAHATRIA
It's an amazing and thought provoking book.

Every page you open, you'll get an answer to the various questions of life.

It truly was life transforming for me and for each and everyone I've met who has read this book.

On birthdays of my friends and family I buy this book and give it as a gift to each and every one, whom I want to excel and have ABUNDANCE in their lives.

I hope you will find your answers too.
.
.
.
.
You can also follow him and his life transforming sessions at INFINITHEISM.
com


Richard Byrds’ Alone.
It’s an old book,by the man who was an antarctic explorer early in the last century.
By then,of course,Admunssen had reached the South Pole,s had poor Scott.
Byrds expedition was a scientific one.
He decided that while his colleagues studied conditions in a different spot,he would do so elsewhere,alone.
He wanted to think.
He spent months in isoltion,only speaking to his friends in the evening by radio.
After a few months he began to feel ill.
Unknown to him there had been a buildup of carbon monoxide from his stove.
He knew that any attempt to rescue him would endanger his friends so he denied anything was wrong.
In the lowest depths ,totallly isolated from everyone and everything he evaluates the meaning of life.
A very powerful book .
Probably out of print .
A pity,because it deserves to be better known.


As I love to read the novel either its fiction or non fiction.
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.
.
.
.
.
.
There are many novels which I have already read….
.
like
Chetan Bhagat's.
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2 state, Revolution 2020 Five point someone.
.
Half Girlfriend.
.

There are many others like….
I too had a love story.
.
.
Can love happens twice.
.
.
The secret.
.
.
.
The notebook.
.
.
.
.
In the middle of world war.
.
.
.
.
.
The shack.
.
.
.
Twilight series….
.
.
Turning point .
.
.
Harry Potter series.
.
.
.
And many more ( right now I have forget many names of the book).
.
.
.
.

As I have learnt alot of things from different books .
.
.
Many books taught me to be calm and have patience.
.
.
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Many books increase my thinking power….
.

From the first day when I have started reading books.
.
.
I have found many change in my self.
.
.
.
.
.
.
I have learnt to be calm in any of the situation.
.
.
.
.
So these books helps me alot.
.
.
.

Thats all.
.
.
.
Thanks


It is a very difficult question, because I didn’t learn from one book.
But if I have to give one which influenced me the most, which triggered me to think the most, which made me research the most, and which ultimately reconstructed my worldview, I can say that Arthur Schopenhauer’s “The World as Will and Representation” is that book.
This book triggered a lot of other reading and many hours of thinking.

So, that book is the best, which no so much teaches you something, but rather triggers you to go trough much struggle to understand.
That book is the best which confuses you so much, as to make you go through much pain clearing that confusion.
If you live calmly and think that you know something, that book is the best which undermines this thinking.

Updated: 18.06.2019 — 6:09 pm

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