Do authors write more than one book at a time

Do authors write more than one book at a time?


"Do authors write more than one book at a time?"
Stages.

Most books have stages: the prep stage, where the writer outlines or researches a new project; the drafting stage, where the first rough sketch of the entire story is written down; the first editing round, which turns the draft into a manuscript fit to be read by outsiders; and the polishing stage, where the definite manuscript is turned into a book.

So, you don't write a book, but a draft, which may or may not turn into a book.
And the editing rounds can be more than one, before the manuscript is ready to be polished.

It's good to take a little distance from a draft or manuscript prior to editing or polishing, so that you can read what's on the page, instead of what's in your head.
Which is why most writers have several projects going at the same time.
Stephen King, for instance, writes most of his short stories when he gets stalled on his longer writing projects.

In a similar fashion, I often write the shorter KillFiles simultaneously with drafting the novels.
Locked Room was written while I was prepping Reprobate for release, Microchip Murder was written while I waited for feedback on the Peccadillo manuscript, Fundamental Error was written while I was working on Rogue, and Aconite Attack was written when I got stuck writing Ghosting.
Throughout writing the first three novels, I was working on a noir, In Pocket, which I started on roughly around the time I finished my first draft of Reprobate.
Apart from my Amsterdam Assassin Series, I wrote an erotic suspense novel, Just Enough Rope, on a dare from my wife, during a family holiday.
I plan to make Just Enough Rope to be part of a trilogy with the same characters, so I'm currently drafting Limelight, the sequel to Just Enough Rope, while I'm also drafting Drone, the fifth novel in the Amsterdam Assassin Series.

Shifting back and forth between projects allows me to keep a fresh perspective on my work.
And if something works, there's not reason to change work methods.




I like to bounce between picture books and my young adult novels to give myself a break and stretch my creative muscles.
Each one requires a different approach to both story and the writing so it's really fun.
Picture books also are shorter so even though I work hard on them, I can complete them faster than a novel and that gives me a sense of accomplishment, something I need as I continue to revise my current novel.

Interestingly, working on picture books has helped me streamline my novels.
After working on a picture book where I've spent a lot of time saying a lot in few words, I can see the "fat" in a scene or scenes and do some trimming that improves the pace and flow.

I'd love to be able to work on two novels at a time – right now I have a tough time keeping everything straight for just one! I admire all those who are able to do it and aspire to do the same one day.



Hello!
The answer to your question is yes and no.

Some authors really have so many plots on their mind, they parallel write a few books.
The research goes similarly.

Others simply concentrate on a single idea.
They go deep into it and write about it very slowly.

For me, I get a lot of ideas for short stories and books, so I scribble them down in a book and concentrate on the current project.

Honestly, each writer does what works for him.
It is generally what you choose according to your convenience.

Hope this helps!


I’m not an author yet, but yes it is common.
I am working on an eight book series and I plan on writing one every six months, and then going back for editing after they are all done.
This way, I get away from those specific sections for a long time, and I can always go back and change details that don’t match up.


Do authors write more than one book at a time?


"Do authors write more than one book at a time?"
Stages.

Most books have stages: the prep stage, where the writer outlines or researches a new project; the drafting stage, where the first rough sketch of the entire story is written down; the first editing round, which turns the draft into a manuscript fit to be read by outsiders; and the polishing stage, where the definite manuscript is turned into a book.

So, you don't write a book, but a draft, which may or may not turn into a book.
And the editing rounds can be more than one, before the manuscript is ready to be polished.

It's good to take a little distance from a draft or manuscript prior to editing or polishing, so that you can read what's on the page, instead of what's in your head.
Which is why most writers have several projects going at the same time.
Stephen King, for instance, writes most of his short stories when he gets stalled on his longer writing projects.

In a similar fashion, I often write the shorter KillFiles simultaneously with drafting the novels.
Locked Room was written while I was prepping Reprobate for release, Microchip Murder was written while I waited for feedback on the Peccadillo manuscript, Fundamental Error was written while I was working on Rogue, and Aconite Attack was written when I got stuck writing Ghosting.
Throughout writing the first three novels, I was working on a noir, In Pocket, which I started on roughly around the time I finished my first draft of Reprobate.
Apart from my Amsterdam Assassin Series, I wrote an erotic suspense novel, Just Enough Rope, on a dare from my wife, during a family holiday.
I plan to make Just Enough Rope to be part of a trilogy with the same characters, so I'm currently drafting Limelight, the sequel to Just Enough Rope, while I'm also drafting Drone, the fifth novel in the Amsterdam Assassin Series.

Shifting back and forth between projects allows me to keep a fresh perspective on my work.
And if something works, there's not reason to change work methods.




I like to bounce between picture books and my young adult novels to give myself a break and stretch my creative muscles.
Each one requires a different approach to both story and the writing so it's really fun.
Picture books also are shorter so even though I work hard on them, I can complete them faster than a novel and that gives me a sense of accomplishment, something I need as I continue to revise my current novel.

Interestingly, working on picture books has helped me streamline my novels.
After working on a picture book where I've spent a lot of time saying a lot in few words, I can see the "fat" in a scene or scenes and do some trimming that improves the pace and flow.

I'd love to be able to work on two novels at a time – right now I have a tough time keeping everything straight for just one! I admire all those who are able to do it and aspire to do the same one day.



Hello!
The answer to your question is yes and no.

Some authors really have so many plots on their mind, they parallel write a few books.
The research goes similarly.

Others simply concentrate on a single idea.
They go deep into it and write about it very slowly.

For me, I get a lot of ideas for short stories and books, so I scribble them down in a book and concentrate on the current project.

Honestly, each writer does what works for him.
It is generally what you choose according to your convenience.

Hope this helps!


I’m not an author yet, but yes it is common.
I am working on an eight book series and I plan on writing one every six months, and then going back for editing after they are all done.
This way, I get away from those specific sections for a long time, and I can always go back and change details that don’t match up.


Do authors write more than one book at a time?


"Do authors write more than one book at a time?"
Stages.

Most books have stages: the prep stage, where the writer outlines or researches a new project; the drafting stage, where the first rough sketch of the entire story is written down; the first editing round, which turns the draft into a manuscript fit to be read by outsiders; and the polishing stage, where the definite manuscript is turned into a book.

So, you don't write a book, but a draft, which may or may not turn into a book.
And the editing rounds can be more than one, before the manuscript is ready to be polished.

It's good to take a little distance from a draft or manuscript prior to editing or polishing, so that you can read what's on the page, instead of what's in your head.
Which is why most writers have several projects going at the same time.
Stephen King, for instance, writes most of his short stories when he gets stalled on his longer writing projects.

In a similar fashion, I often write the shorter KillFiles simultaneously with drafting the novels.
Locked Room was written while I was prepping Reprobate for release, Microchip Murder was written while I waited for feedback on the Peccadillo manuscript, Fundamental Error was written while I was working on Rogue, and Aconite Attack was written when I got stuck writing Ghosting.
Throughout writing the first three novels, I was working on a noir, In Pocket, which I started on roughly around the time I finished my first draft of Reprobate.
Apart from my Amsterdam Assassin Series, I wrote an erotic suspense novel, Just Enough Rope, on a dare from my wife, during a family holiday.
I plan to make Just Enough Rope to be part of a trilogy with the same characters, so I'm currently drafting Limelight, the sequel to Just Enough Rope, while I'm also drafting Drone, the fifth novel in the Amsterdam Assassin Series.

Shifting back and forth between projects allows me to keep a fresh perspective on my work.
And if something works, there's not reason to change work methods.




I like to bounce between picture books and my young adult novels to give myself a break and stretch my creative muscles.
Each one requires a different approach to both story and the writing so it's really fun.
Picture books also are shorter so even though I work hard on them, I can complete them faster than a novel and that gives me a sense of accomplishment, something I need as I continue to revise my current novel.

Interestingly, working on picture books has helped me streamline my novels.
After working on a picture book where I've spent a lot of time saying a lot in few words, I can see the "fat" in a scene or scenes and do some trimming that improves the pace and flow.

I'd love to be able to work on two novels at a time – right now I have a tough time keeping everything straight for just one! I admire all those who are able to do it and aspire to do the same one day.



Hello!
The answer to your question is yes and no.

Some authors really have so many plots on their mind, they parallel write a few books.
The research goes similarly.

Others simply concentrate on a single idea.
They go deep into it and write about it very slowly.

For me, I get a lot of ideas for short stories and books, so I scribble them down in a book and concentrate on the current project.

Honestly, each writer does what works for him.
It is generally what you choose according to your convenience.

Hope this helps!


I’m not an author yet, but yes it is common.
I am working on an eight book series and I plan on writing one every six months, and then going back for editing after they are all done.
This way, I get away from those specific sections for a long time, and I can always go back and change details that don’t match up.

Updated: 15.06.2019 — 4:15 pm

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